Category Archives: Toddler

The Colours of My Eid: Memories of Hajj and Eid al-Adha by Suzanne Muir illustrated by Azra Momin

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The Colours of My Eid: Memories of Hajj and Eid al-Adha by Suzanne Muir illustrated by Azra Momin

 

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At 18 pages, this 8 x 8 book focused around colors contains a lot more information than what initially meets your eyes.  The warm beautiful, full page pictures fall opposite a highlighted color and a description of that color in the child’s world that reminds the characters of their time at Hajj or celebrating Eid al-Adha.  On each of the fun text pages is a light green text box at the bottom with factual information that older children or adults will benefit from and be able to share with younger listeners.  The main text is ideal for toddlers and up, and older kids up to 3rd grade will benefit from the nonfiction highlights that can educate or remind Muslims and non Muslims alike, about the importance of Hajj and Eid al-Adha.  

The book starts with an introduction about the Islamic language and perspective used, and clarifies that the colours emphasized are to help visualize the point being made, it also gives information about Eid al-Adha.

The colors highlighted are: white, black, brown, green, grey, yellow, and purple.  The large simple text takes something relatable such as the monkey bars, or balloons, or the sky and corresponds it to a memory of Arafat, or ihram, or the hills of Safa and Marwa.

The nonfiction text gives specific dimensions of the Ka’aba, the story of Hajar and baby Ismail, the requirement of Hajj and some of the steps.  There is a lot of information conveyed which at times is incredibly detailed, and sometimes, rather vague and generic, i.e. Tawaf is when Muslim pilgrims circle the Ka’aba as part of the Hajj rituals. Overall, this little book packs a punch, and I was equally impressed at how it held my five year old’s attention with the colors, and my interest with the facts detailed below.

 

 

 

Little Rocket’s Imaan Boosting Journey by Ilm Bubbles

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Little Rocket’s Imaan Boosting Journey by Ilm Bubbles

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This 32 page toddler to first grade picture book at first appears to be just another book praising Allah’s creation from the ground level up to the heavens as the main character is a personified rocket ship.  However, I was delighted to see that after a few pages the book goes deeper in both Islamic messaging and in literary action.  Told in rhyme, Little Rocket will face dangerous comets, make desperate humbled duas for help, be rescued by Officer Cosmo, show gratitude, and grow in his imaan and understanding of Allah’s creation and mercy.  With a guide at the end to further involve children in the lessons of the book, and a glossary; the bright glossy illustrations will give little Muslims important well woven in lessons in a fun story packaging.

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Little Rocket is about to take off from his little town, it is his first flight, so he is a little nervous.  A little dhikr calms his heart and bismillah he is off. He prayers for courage as he looks down and sees so many of Allah’s creations.

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As he enters space the colors of Earth become the dark sky full of stars and planets that do not fall.  Careful not to get too close to the burning sun.  Little Rocket wants to keep heading toward Neptune, but needs to take a rest on a rocky moon.  As he drifts off to sleep in the quiet of space he is abruptly awoken by comets hitting the surface.

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Little Rocket is hit and the ash is thick from the destruction.  He gets stuck from falling debris and prays to Allah swt for help.  A brave blue rocket, Officer Cosmo, hears something, and comes to Little Rocket’s aid.  SubhanAllah Officer Cosmo is able to save a very grateful Little Rocket.

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Little Rocket heads home feeling closer to Allah swt then he did when he left that morning and knows that “There is none worthy of Worship, but Allah.”

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The power of Dua saved the day and with concepts and vocabulary of space all combined in a story with a sweet plot, this book will be requested over and over, and inshaAllah help little ones to appreciate and trust Allah always.

Laith the Lion Goes to Palestine by Jameeleh Shelo illustrated by Sara Mcmullin

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Laith the Lion Goes to Palestine by Jameeleh Shelo illustrated by Sara Mcmullin

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This 36 page toddler to kindergarten book features a little lion that doesn’t like to sleep.  One night he wishes for friends to play with and his crib starts shaking and moving and a magical adventure begins to unfold. The story highlights and celebrates Palestine, as that is where the crib takes him, but the story is also about not wanting to go to sleep, not wanting to miss anything fun, and seeing nighttime and daytime routines.  I love that it shows tatreez (embroidery), and mentions olives, and the friends he makes on the beach playing soccer are so welcoming, even gifting him a keffiyeh to keep warm with, but I really wanted more sites of Palestine, and more childish adventure and wonder about the beloved country.  The book mentions wishing and uses the word “hate” in describing how Laith feels about bedtime.  The taytas wear hijab, but there is no mention of religion.  The book is a great introduction to Palestine or a mirror for Palestinian children to see themselves in a fun animal led universal story.

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Laith is a lion, his mom is a giraffe and his father a bird (perhaps a hawk or falcon), he loves bath time and story time, but not bedtime, he doesn’t want to miss anything.  So when he makes a wish and finds himself flying outside in his crib, he is disappointed to see mama and baba asleep. his taytas asleep, and all of his friends sleeping too.  He wishes for someone to play with, and roar he is off to Palestine, where his night is their daytime. 

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In his world every character is an animal, but in his adventure, the characters are human.  He sees a grandma and eats an olive before asking some kids playing soccer on the beach if he can join.  As they play and cheer he gets cold and wants to go home.  He invites his friends, but they have to stay.  They gift him a keffiyah, and he leaves. 

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On his way back to his room, he looks in on his friends. Daliyah is getting dressed for school.  Zain and Idris are brushing their teeth, and his taytas are making breakfast. When he wakes up he tells his parents he wants to go back to Palestine, and they remark on him having a beautiful dream. 

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I love that there are diverse kids depicted in Palestine, that Laith’s grandmas are involved in his daily life, that the concept of day and night on different sides of the world is accounted for.  I don’t know how I feel about the voyeurism, sure it is innocent enough, but maybe Daliyah could have been getting ready for school, rather than getting dressed.  I like that the keffiyah came back with him and the illustrations show the Dome of the Rock.  

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I bought this as an ebook, because I was impatient and didn’t want to wait for shipping to show support to Palestinian books and authors.  It came with a coloring sheet as well, and is $2.99 on the website https://www.laiththelion.com/ it is also available as a hardback book on the website (heavily discounted) or on Amazon at its regular price.

Mel and His Trouble with One Thousand Shoes by Somayeh Zomorodi illustrated by N. Broomand

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The book has a solid premise, although it reads a lot like The Very Greedy Bee, and has lovely 8.5 by 11 pictures on its 24 pages, but unfortunately the text is all over the place. The story contradicts itself, it is overly wordy, and way to rhymy. Yeah, rhymy isn’t even a word, but if it were, this book, would be a great example. I struggled with the font as well, the lowercase f looks like a capital F, and no matter how many times I read it, I’d get tripped up thinking an interior word was being capitalized. The book says that it is based on the ayat in the Quran that reads, “And do not walk on the earth proudly,” and even has two other ayats listed at the end as inspiration, but really it is a single page and a single character that blurts out the ayats from the Quran that talk about walking on the earth proudly and this world being a test. While the illustrations are fun, it just isn’t enough to make the book a solid read to convey humbleness and gratitude. Children will be lost in the text, confused by the inconsistencies, and disappointed in the super quick resolution.

Mel the millipede lives in a farm next to a well. He has one thousand feet and although he doesn’t need shoes, he likes to collect them. He has 950 and is working to find the remaining 50 to complete his collection.

It says, “No one was as happy as Mel; one could tell.” Then on the next page as he cleans his shoes with a blouse it is revealed that he isn’t happy in his heart because he is always alone. But the picture stills shows him smiling.

He finally has his 1,000 shoes, we don’t know how or where he got them, when a small snail tells him that “God says not to walk on the earth proudly. Only He knows best and this world is a test.” There is no explanation, Mel just says “it doesn’t matter, I am better than everyone.”

This whole time walking, Mel has been wearing his shoes although it has mentioned that he can’t wear them because they are heavy and he doesn’t want to get them dirty. As he watches the other bugs fly kites and balloons he is sad that he can’t play because his shoes are too heavy. But he has been walking outdoors and is on a mushroom lamenting with his shoes on. Those flying kites aren’t moving much…one is a worm, one a snail, very inconsistent.

One night a moth knocks on his door warning Mel of a flood. Mel ignores the frantic urgings, fearing that it is a trap to get his shoes. He thinks everyone is jealous of his shoeing. The flood waters sweep him and his shoes out of the house and throughout the night he risks his life multiple times to save his beloved shoes.

When morning arrives, he is still trying to save his shoes, when moth, attempts to save Mel. To get Mel back to his house, he will have to convince him to drop his shoes. Mel is tired and desperate and uninspired so he drops his shoes and is brought to dry land. I don’t think uninspired is the right word, shouldn’t be be grateful and willing to change to save his life? But even that notion is a stretch because in the illustrations he is so close to land. He could just swim over, shoes or no shoes, moth doesn’t need to be flying him to safety. Additionally, when the water recedes, won’t his shoes still be there?

The conclusion is Mel hugging moth and apologizing to the bugs. I’m not sure what he is apologizing to them for, nor is it explained. Since the book claims to be based or inspired by ayats, I feel like this would have been a good place for a moral cathartic lesson, but alas, it just says, “the end.”

Salaam, World by Samia Khan illustrated by Teresa Abboud

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Salaam, World by Samia Khan illustrated by Teresa Abboud

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This 26 page rhyming picture book starts out basic enough with salaam being said from various locations, but it digs a little deeper as the book progresses to explain what salaam means, and how to respond. A good introduction to the greeting of peace for ages three and up. The pictures are jungle animals testing out the word and the 10 by 10 size is sufficient for bedtime and in small groups. My picky critiques are I don’t like the font as I think it is hard for early independent readers to decipher when capitalized, words such as “catastrophic” and “salutation” are a bit advanced for the demographic, and I wish there was a bit more Islam in the book, but overall it is sufficient, and an effective tool to helping get little ones to say salaam.img_0246

“Salaam from above, salaam from below, salaam from the mountaintops covered in snow,” is how the book begins as a cat hanging from a tree and braving the elements offers his greetings. A donkey then asks us to hold up and explain what the word means.

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Salaam is defined as meaning peace in Arabic and a word that Muslims use that is like ‘hello’ only kinder. It is sending peace to those you say it to, and a show of respect. The animals say it to others before noting that you can say it short or long: Salaam or Assalamualaikum.

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The book then asks how to respond before teaching us to say walaikum-assalam and telling us not to be alarmed the next time we hear the greeting, but to return it and spread it.

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Is That a Teapot by the Toilet: A Muslim Child’s Potty Training Story by Rabia Bashir illustrated by Basma Hosam

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Is That a Teapot by the Toilet: A Muslim Child’s Potty Training Story by Rabia Bashir illustrated by Basma Hosam

I think I’ve loved every Bismillah/Precious Bees book I’ve ever read, and this book is no exception.  It is only the second children’s book I’ve ever seen on the subject of Islamic bathroom etiquette and I think combined with My First Muslim Potty Book, our little Muslims and their potty trainer adults are in a great position to explain, teach, laugh, and be successful in getting our little ones out of diapers and adopting Islamic Sunnahs and hygiene.   I love that this book is inspired by the author’s real life experiences, that it starts with a few WHO facts about the lack of access people have worldwide to a proper toilet with a portion of the book sales going to help those who lack hygienic facilities, and that the book is approved by a Sheikh.  Additionally, I love that there is a song that goes along with it (it isn’t posted yet, but will be shortly inshaAllah), that there are questions and games at the end with informative pages about istinja and the duas to be said, it is silly, the illustrations adorable and expressive, and overall just oh so relatable.  The book is perfect for ages three and up, and a great reminder resource for older kids that may need a nudge to stay on top of their bathroom behavior and feel normalized by seeing themselves in the pages.

It is a big day for mom and dad and Rayyan and Ridhwan.  Rayyan is going to start using the potty.  They have practiced entering the bathroom, but now they are going to do it for real: saying Bismillah and entering with the left foot first.  Only he uses his right, so they do it again, and it happens once more, and now mom and Rayyan are laughing and dancing.  The third time is the charm and in they go.

He sits on his little potty, and he goes, hurray, but when he starts to stand up, Mama explains that he must clean himself, all Muslims do.  Rayyan asks if that is a teapot when Mama lifts up what she calls in Bengali a bodna and his Urdu speaking father calls a lota.

Lota sticks and Rayyan is washed and ready to clean his hands before heading out the door with his right foot and saying Ghufranaka. So far so good, but it isn’t a one time thing.  There are a lot of days of accidents, but over time it gets better so the family decides to head out.  When all of a sudden Rayyan has to go, the family runs to a halal restaurant to borrow their restroom.

Phew they made it just in time, and instead of a teapot looking lota they have a watering can which makes his dad have to stand really far away to help him wash. Rayyan notices different places have lotas that look different than his does at home.  At a wedding they had to use a plastic cup, the mosque has a mini shower, at the park Mama pulls out a plastic bottle from her purse.  Rayyan decides he wants his own little bottle too, so they pick one out that he can keep in his backpack.  

One year later it is a big day for Ridhwan, he is about to start potty training, like kids all over the world. There is then a two page spread about many words different languages use to call the vessel that they use to wash themselves in the bathroom. There are questions to talk about regarding the story, a maze to get to the restroom in time, the Muslim Potty Training Song to the tune of the Hokey Gokey, which I’m assuming in America is the Hokey Pokey, a page answering What is Istinja?, Duas when using the toilet, the story behind the story, information about the illustrator and about the author.  All-in-all 48 pages.  

I purchased mine on Amazon, I think the local stockists will have it shortly and I would assume the bismillahbees.com website will as well.  I know the author recently had her father pass away, inna lillahi wa inna illayhi rajioon, so please make duas for her and her family, and be patient on the QR code and song which inshaAllah are forthcoming.

The Prayer to the Merciful for Little Ones by Saniyasnain Khan illustrated by Bindia Thapar

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The Prayer to the Merciful for Little Ones by Saniyasnain Khan illustrated by Bindia Thapar

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This 14 page board book is a prayer based on Surah Fatiha and explores the first few ayats with reflective and thoughtful duas.  It has soft muted illustrations of birds and nature on small 5 by 5 pages.  The idea of the book is sweet and soft that I can imagine reading it with a child in your lap after salat, or perhaps whispering into them at bedtime, but it really is a prayer for the parents to read.  Children might understand from the text that everything is from Allah swt and He is always with us and helps us, but because it doesn’t repeat those notions, I don’t think the message will stick. The vocabulary is not reflective of toddlers understanding, and really the comfort comes from them listening to a loved one’s voice not the text or pictures.  I have five kids, this book was purchased when I was pregnant with the first one, I don’t think it has ever willingly been picked up by any of them or sat through in the idyllic picturesque manner that a person with no children would imagine spawning from such a heartfelt book.  I hope I’m in the minority and other families have loved and appreciated this book as it was undoubtedly intended.

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The book starts with a complete english translation of Surah al Fatiha.  The next two page spread is entitled “Praise be to Allah” which is explored in the text of praising Allah for the blessing given and knowledge of Allah being close. The theme isn’t entirely on point, but follows the rhythm of duas: praising Allah swt and glorifying him mixed in with making your requests.

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“Lord of the Universe” is the next heading, followed by “The Compassionate, the Merciful,” “Master of the Day of Judgement,” “You alone we worship and to You alone we turn for help.”  The final section is “Guide us to the straight path.”

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The book came out in 2003, and I was ecstatic to see it available, however, there are now just better and more varied options available, that this one will once again be lost on my shelves.

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My First Book About the Qur’an: Teachings for Toddlers and Young Children y Sara Khan illustrated by Ali Lodge

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My First Book About the Qur’an: Teachings for Toddlers and Young Children y Sara Khan illustrated by Ali Lodge

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I had planned to review the Ramadan book in Sara Khan’s My First Book about series, but needless-to-say all of the board books in the collection look remarkably similar and the one on my shelf, that I thought was the Ramadan one is this one, the one about the Qur’an.  Rather than find another Ramadan book, I figured to just go with it, Ramadan is the month of the Qur’an after all, and the book is both informative and engaging for little Muslims.  The soft detailed pictures and sturdy binding introduce toddlers and up to the belief in Allah, the pillars, care for all creation and being good to one another.

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The book starts out stating the the Qur’an tells us in the beginning there was only Allah, and that He created everything.  His creations are as big as the heavens and the Earth and as small as the creatures we cannot even see.  He created the trees and mountains and the angels and jinn, as well as the people, He made us all special.

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Allah wants us to follow His rules and sent books and Prophets to show us how to act.  He wants us to be good to one another, to be thankful, to look after our world, and everything in it.  Allah wants us to worship Him alone and pray five times a day, fast in Ramadan, give money to the poor, and go for Hajj.

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He also wants us to have families and to get married and raise our children to be good Muslims, so that when we die we will go to Paradise.  The book ends with facts about the Qur’an and questions and answers that can help further the conversation, increase understanding, and encourage love for the holy book.

Ramadan by Mari Schuh

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This 16 page holiday book is one in a series of six.  It keeps the text simple, the images bright and inviting, and turns the pages in to a search and find activity to increase time spent with the material.  The information is accurate and basic, there is nothing wrong (phew) with this recent addition to the very crowded nonfiction holiday book field.  In fact I appreciate that dates are explained and that the food looks tempting even if non Muslim children aren’t familiar with the dishes.  It shows a child in sajood and explains that he is praying. The realistic pictures show smiling faces and Muslim kids will feel represented. Non Muslim readers will become familiar with Ramadan as a time of fasting, the Quran, and prayer.

The pictures to look for are given at the beginning and again at the end with the “answers.” The limited pages have very minimal text.  The first one mentions a lantern being hung for Ramadan. It then states that Ramadan is a Muslim holy month where people fast, don’t eat or drink.

It shows a picture of the Quran and says it is used to pray, before showing someone praying on a prayer rug. When the sun has set it is time to eat. Dates are a sweet fruit to snack on after dark. It then shows a child and adult making dua and again reiterates that the holy month is for praying and helping others.

‘Tis The Night Before Eid by Yasmin Rashidi illustrated by Mariam Aldacher

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On the surface this 32 page inspired re-imagining of the classic Christmas poem might not seem that impressive, but it is really quite effective in highlighting general key points of Ramadan, the mix of sadness that Ramadan has gone too quickly with the excitement of Eid, and showing the diversity of Muslim families and communities.  The large 8 x 10 hard bound pages showcase fun and relatable illustrations that would help inform those unfamiliar with the holiday, while also mirroring and encouraging Ramadan and Eid excitement.  It is already a favorite at our house and with simple rhyming lines, the book can lend itself easily to more in-depth discussions (there is a glossary at the back) or be kept as a sweet flowing story that you don’t mind reading repeatedly at the prodding of toddlers and preschoolers alike.

img_8997The story starts with it being the night before Eid.   Ramadan has flown by, iftar eaten, dishes are put away, trips to the masjid for Taraweh have concluded and now it is time to prepare for Eid.  The house is cleaned, clothes ironed, sweets prepared and dreams of gifts filling the kids minds.

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The narrative bounces back to Ramadan to explain that fasting is not eating til sundown for 30 days, that Quran was revealed during the blessed month and that we hold on to the lessons of Ramadan all year long.

 

I pre-ordered mine from the author’s website https://rashidibooks.com/home , but it is also available at Crescent Moon Store https://crescentmoonstore.com/products/twas-the-night-before-eid.  There are also printables on the author’s website.

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