Category Archives: Toddler

The Prophet’s Pond by Zaheer Khatri

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The Prophet’s Pond by Zaheer Khatri

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Based on the hadith as narrated by Saheeh Al-Bukhari, “Remain patient until you meet me by the pond.”  The book follows a little boy (and his mom) searching for the pond mentioned in hadith as the place Prophet Muhammad (saw) will be waiting for us in the hereafter.

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The beautiful, faceless pictures, radiate with beauty and light as they journey from pond to pond in search of one that has all the characteristics of the one described to us.  One that takes a month’s journey to cross one of the sides, one that is whiter than milk, smells better than musk, is colder than ice, is sweeter than honey, that has as many cups to drink from as stars in the sky, and one that if you drink from it you will never be thirsty again.  theprophetspondinside3.jpg

The mother is brought along on this journey to help, and it takes her a few ponds to figure out who her son is hoping to meet in this 23 page hardbound book.  But alas, the rhyming stanzas come to an end and she advises her boy, and the reader, to live the way the Prophet instructed to, inshaAllah, in the akhira meet him by his pond.

The book is perfect for 3  to 7 year olds, with older children enjoying a reading or two as well.  

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The Prophet’s Faithful Friend: The Story of the Great Hijrah by RS Khan illustrated by A Saha

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The Prophet’s Faithful Friend: The Story of the Great Hijrah by RS Khan illustrated by A Saha

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This book is written in verse, and while some of the 32 pages are overly heavy in text, it does for the most part stick to appealing to younger children, 4 years old and up.  I had hoped the book would be more about Abu Bakr as Sadeeq, but it really is just a simplified retelling of a part of the Hijrah.  There is nothing wrong with that, I just had hoped for more about their friendship.

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The only real specifics of the Hijrah are that of Suraaqah, and the inability he and his horse faced while trying to get close to the Prophet and his friend.

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The book is meant for Muslim children as it shows some of the fears that RasulAllah faced, ways Allah swt protected him, and gets children excited as the two reach Madinah safely.  There are Islamic and Arabic words sprinkled through out, without a glossary and children might night some help understanding Quraysh, migration, hastened, suspense, and companion.

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The pictures are bright and the book is printed on thick glossy paper.  There are no faces detailed, and Prophet Muhammad  and Abu Bakr are not pictured.  The pictures seem to get a little ahead of themselves as they show people holding balloons and in wheelchairs, not sure that they were invented or common yet, but perhaps.

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I know I have mentioned it before that there are surprisingly few stand alone books about Prophet Muhammad (AS) for younger children, so while this book isn’t the greatest book ever, it is pretty good amongst few other options.

Mommy’s Khimar by Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow illustrated by Ebony Glenn

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Mommy’s Khimar by Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow illustrated by Ebony Glenn

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Children playing dress-up with their mother’s clothes is a universal activity, that most can relate to.  Playing dress-up in your mother’s khimar is what makes this book both familiar and stereotype breaking in a way that is actually pretty powerful.

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In this 40 page hardback book targeting 4-8 year olds, Salaam Reads, once again brings Muslim characters to the masses, without alienating or talking down to either Muslim or non Muslims readers.

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The story starts off with a little girl explaining that “A khimar is a flowing scarf that my mommy wears.  Before she walks out the door each day, she wraps one around her head.”  She then marvels at the variety of scarves her mother has, commenting on the colors, and prints, and designs, that by the time she is ready to use them as her favorite make-believe accessory, readers will be wishing they too could have such an assortment.

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From using a khimar to be a queen with a golden train, to being a shooting star, the reader also along the way learns that she loves the connection the khimars offer her of her mother, when she isn’t near.  The ladies at the masjid are also part of that connection so that when she dreams of all the fantastical pretend things she can be, she also knows they too are with her.  Even her grandma, Mom-Mom, who exclaims “Sweet Jesus” when she sees her in her yellow khimar, and loves her although she doesn’t go to the mosque like the little girl does, is a part of the love and support the little girl feels by those around her when she is wrapped up in her mother’s khimar.  download (1)I love that it stresses even though her grandma is not Muslim they love each other because they are family.  Muslims and Islam are never mentioned outright, just the mosque and the ladies saying Assalamu alaikum, hint at the khimar being worn for religious reasons.

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Perhaps the best part is the pictures.  The illustrations with their yellowish hues radiate warmth and the faces and smiles are good for the soul.  You can feel the love the little girl both receives and gives to those around her through the pictures that perfectly compliment the simple text.

The diversity of the book in the main character being a girl, a child of color, and a Muslim, is such a beautiful thing to see.  Stories like this are powerful tools when children see themselves in books with positive messages, and remind us all how much more diversity it needed in literature to both highlight our differences, and celebrate our similarities.

 

To Catch a Bug by Nabeel Akbar illustrated by Anam Ahmed

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To Catch a Bug by Nabeel Akbar illustrated by Anam Ahmed

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This adorable preschool age book written in verse features a little girl who is fascinated by the bugs and creatures outside.  Highlighting Allah’s creations and adding in some humor, the little girl’s mom doesn’t love bugs very much, makes the book a silly read-a-loud that doesn’t get boring.

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The 8×8 size, 16 pages, makes it perfect for bedtime as it is labeled as a “bedtime short. ” The text size and length is ideal for the age group and the pictures perfectly engage the listeners with their chunky simplicity and brightness.

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The mom wears hijab, and Islamic phrases such as Subhanallah, Alhamdulillah, Inshallah, Bismillah are used, but not defined in the text, their is a glossary at the beginning.  Thus, it would work for non-Muslims, but the intended audience, i think, are little Muslim kids.

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Mustafa and Arwa go on a Prayer Adventure by Mekram Mohammad

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Mustafa and Arwa go on a Prayer Adventure by Mekram Mohammad

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This short rhyming book introduces toddlers and little ones to the five daily prayers as it presents the brother sister duo on a typical day.  Ok, so maybe not a typical day, unless dressing up as knights and battling each other, winning medals, and climbing mountains is typical.  But, it presents the salats in time sequence that little ones can understand, more than as hours on a clock or as the various position of the sun.  Fajr is early, and it guards your day, then you go to school, but the book reminds you to remember Allah, then you take a break for duhr and if you do, inshaAllah Allah will help you pass, then you come home and have a snack and then pray Asr, etcetera.  By combining daily activities like spending time with family and reading Quran with the five prayers makes the routine seem doable and inshaAllah making it regular will truly allow us all to battle, win, and reach new heights, ameen.

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The book is a great tool to learn the names of the prayers, and their order, while strengthening a child’s Muslim identity.  There is no glossary or further detail about Salah or how it is performed, but I think assumes that that the reader would be able to provide additional information to the listener.  The book is more to get children excited to pray, and get closer to Allah (swt).

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The illustratrions are adorable and the font and text appealing  to little children.  The book is one in an adventure series by Muslim Pillars, and I look forward to reading Mustafa and Arwa’s other adventures.

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My Mummy’s Tummy by Suzanne Stone illustrated by Suzanne Stone and Omar Faruq

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My Mummy’s Tummy by Suzanne Stone illustrated by Suzanne Stone and Omar Faruq

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The copy I have is called My Mummy’s Tummy, but the binding says My Mummy’s Fat Tummy, I would assume that they are the same book except for this one word, and I’m hoping they opted to remove it at the last minute.  Actually, while on the title, it only  works well for the first four pages and yes, it sets up the story of a new sibling, by page five, the baby is born and mom’s tummy is the least of big sister, Maryam’s worries.

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The 24 page rhyming book, is a good introduction to what kids ages 3-6 can expect with a new sibling.  From Mummy’s large tummy, to having to stay with an Aunt when Mummy’s tummy starts hurting, Maryam is excited to have a new baby sister, except it ends up being a baby brother.  And while she is promised someone to play with, initially all he does is cry and sleep.  With gentle prodding by her parents and islamic reminders of patience and kindness, by the end of the book the baby is nearly one and his favorite person is his big sister Maryam, alhumdulillah.

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I love the diversity of the parents, and the acknowledging that changes are hard without being condescending or dismissive.  The book stays positive and hopeful and reminds us to keep Allah close to us when dealing with challenges and dreaming of the future.

 

Zaydo Potato: Can Allah See Me Now? by Randa Taftaf and Maz Galini illustrated by Lovyaa Garg

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Zaydo Potato: Can Allah See Me Now? by Randa Taftaf and Maz Galini illustrated by Lovyaa Garg

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The book starts off simple enough with a little boy, Zayd playing hide-and-seek with his friend (or maybe cousin), Kareem, and his cat Pepper, when the challenge of hiding where they can’t be found, spawns a lesson in how Allah (swt) is always watching and watching over us.  As the kids hide in different places, the mom uses the names of Allah (swt) to emphasize the point.  The story presents the names of Al-Baseer, the All-seeing, Al Aleem, the All-knowing, Al-Khabeer, the All-aware, Al-Raqeeb, the Watchful, and Al-Shaheed, the Witness.

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The book is 32 pages, with the story taking up 24 of those pages. An ayat from the Quran, surah Hadid verse 4, starts the story and there is a glossary of the names of Allah at the end.  There is also some suggested activities for the book.  Hidden on each page is Pepper the cat and a potato.  There are other activities of finding shapes, counting blocks, finding different animals, etcetera,  that encourage children to go back to the book to engage in the pictures, and inshaAllah the message presented.

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There are two books thus far in the series and one E-book, the order doesn’t matter, as each is a standalone book.  The husband and wife authoring team also have a publishing company, Rummana Publishing Inc, and based on their website seem to have plans for more in the future.  This book came out about six months ago, and with its Glossy cover and large colorful pages, children will enjoy the story and activites.  The pictures are warm and engaging, and overall they are very well done.  The sentences are short, and the amont of words on the page is appropriate for the target audience.  There seems to be some arrant spacing on new text lines, but I doubt anyone would notice, and a few sentences are awkward either in their wording or lacking commas, but again, it is minor.

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A good story premise, easily conveyed to younger Muslims, makes the book an asset for Muslim children establishing a foundation and building a relationship with Allah swt.