Category Archives: Toddler

Crayola Ramadan and Eid Al-Fitr Colors by Mari Schuh

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Crayola Ramadan and Eid Al-Fitr Colors by Mari Schuh

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This 32 page non fiction children’s book uses colors to introduce the very basics of Ramadan and Eid from a non Muslim point of view to a non Muslim audience.  The book is done decently and shows diverse Muslims and bright colors interwoven with facts about the month, but by-and-large it is forgetable and just discusses the broader sense of celebration.  There is very little that is religious outside of the photographs showing Muslims that are used to illustrate the book.  Even the concept of colors in a book by Crayola is a little lacking.  Yes, dates are brown, but just to say that “colorful designs cover prayer rugs,” and that “people shop for red and green vegetables, and many orange and brown fruits are used for meals too,” seems really vague and half hearted.  

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The book starts out with explaining what Ramadan is and defines what a crescent moon is in a blurb under a picture of one. It then explains what happens in Ramadan and dedicates two pages to lanterns that are purple, red, blue and green and used to hang in streets and homes.

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It then moves in to the celebrating of Eid Al-Fitr.  It shows children playing and having fun and receiving gifts and toys to celebrate. It talks about the food and mentions colors of the food without naming or describing them, it then does the same for desserts.

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When explaining the clothes that people wear on Eid, it says that sometimes they are colorful. It then repeats that gifts and money are given, but adds in that they are also given to those in need.

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The book concludes with a page that you can copy and color, a glossary, suggestions to learn more, and an index.

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A much better, color driven albeit not Ramadan and Eid specific choice would be Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns: A Muslim Book of Colors  by Hena Khan on in my opinion. Both are widely available in public libraries, maybe check them both out and let me know what you and your children think.

One Perfect Eid Day and No More Cake! by Suzanne Muir illustrated by Azra Momin

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One Perfect Eid Day and No More Cake! by Suzanne Muir illustrated by Azra Momin

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This lovely counting book celebrates the end of Ramadan and the festivities of Eid Al-Fitr by counting up to 10 and counting back down.  Over 24 pages of rhyming lines, adorable illustrations will bring the holiday to life as a group of children and a little white cat celebrate.  Aside from the title that for some reason I don’t love, the rest of the book is happy and festive and perfect for toddlers to preschoolers.

It starts with one month coming to an end, then henna cones and designs take over, before five pots and six trays of cake are prepared, decorations are hung, clothes are made ready and ten eager eyes watch the new moon rise.

Then ten sleepy cousins have to get up early for morning prayers with presents waiting, rotis are prepared before seven family members squeeze in the van. Friends are met at the masjid and coins are jingling as lunch parties are attended and fun-fair rides are riden. Two tired friends can’t stay away on this one perfect day, and no more cake.

I love the flow of the book, I’m not sure what the four henna designs are or what cousin doesn’t get a present and who doesn’t get to go for prayers, but little kids probably won’t over think it.  The little cat is delightful on each page and the book sets a marvelous tone of what one can look forward to and enjoy on this splendid holiday with friends, family, festivities, and food.

The Adventures of Adam and Anisah: My Brother’s Shield by Zahra Patel illustrated by Reyhana Ismail

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The Adventures of Adam and Anisah: My Brother’s Shield by Zahra Patel illustrated by Reyhana Ismail

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Based on the idea that “Fasting is a Shield (ibn Majah),” this adorable book brings Ramadan not just to life, but makes those that fast into absolute superheroes!  Over 32 pages of simple large rhyming words, little Anisah shares her wonder and amazement toward her brother, and his shield that he wields during Ramadan.  The beauty of her admiration for her older sibling combined with the message, illustrations, and presentation, make this book (there is also an accompanying workbook) perfect for ages three and up.

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It starts with a secret.  Adam is a superhero.  When Ramadan arrives, the shield comes out and Adam carries it all day.  He doesn’t eat or drink when he has it.  It makes him brave and saves him from tempting biscuits.  It gives him peace when he reads Quran. It keeps him calm when there is a foul during a soccer game. It even keeps him away from gossip at the mosque.

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When they break their fast, they pull out their magic carpet to fly.  And when Ramadan is over the shield goes away until it is needed again. Anisah patiently marks off the days on the calendar until Ramadan will arrive, because she has another secret.  She is training to be a superhero too.

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The book concludes with how the story came about, discussion questions and some activities to help learn through practice. The illustrations show diversity and whimsy and toddlers and preschoolers, I’m certain will be begging for this story all year around.

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Ramadan by Lori Dittmer

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Ramadan by Lori Dittmer

 

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I understand and appreciate that every time a series of holiday books come out Ramadan is bound to be included, but this 2021, 24 page kindergarten geared nonfiction book really offers nothing new.  In fact, while the realistic photographs on each two page spread are nice, I take issue with the page that says, “In A.D. 609 the prophet Muhammad began writing a book.  The Quran is God’s word to Muslims.” First of all, Prophet Muhammad (capitalize the P please), didn’t write the book and the Quran is for all people.  

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The book starts out welcoming Ramadan and showing a child in sajud, without explanaition, I wonder and worry how a non Muslim child woud understand this act.  Would they take it as an act of worship? Not sure.

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The next page mentions Ramadan as a time of prayer and thinking of others before explaining that it is the ninth month of the Muslim year and starts with the new moon.

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It then details that lanterns are set out and hung in windows by many, but doesn’t tell why or hint at cultural reasoning.  The problamatic page follows, and then it shows an older man reading Quran and says that some repeat the whole Quran during the blessed month.

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I like that it mentions that from sunrise to sunset people do not eat or drink and that they try to be calm.  At night people eat dates and drink water and share a meal called iftar.

There are then pictures of Ramadan, a lantern, iftar, dates and Quran, before a page of vocabulary, further reading suggestions and an index conclude the book.  The definition for prophet, seemed a little off for me, “someone who speaks for God.”  Why not say someone who spreads God’s message?

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I wouldn’t encourage this book be shared with little ones, or in interfaith, like I said, there are much better fiction and nonfiction books about Ramadan for this age level.

 

Red Shoes by Karen English illustrated by Ebony Glenn

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Red Shoes by Karen English illustrated by Ebony Glenn

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This delightful 32 page picture book links two girls, two ends of the world, two cultures and two stories together with a pair of red shoes.  The short sentences pop with action and the perfectly illustrated two-page spreads convey relatable emotion and joy.  The beloved shoes travel on the feet of one character to a wedding, Christmas dinner, and birthdays, they are then are donated and journey to West Africa to be given as a gift for a little girl who fasted half of Ramadan.   The message I hope children ages three and up will get from the story, is that we are more alike than different, that we should take care of our things (amazingly the shoes weren’t worn out), and that we should donate things of good quality that we ourselves value.  I hope it doesn’t lend itself to perpetuate the stereotype that we can send our castaway items to Africa, being the author comments in her bio on the back flap that her husband is from West Africa and that she frequently visits there, I’m hoping that this is just me being overly cautious in the messaging, and nothing is being implied or negatively taken from a casual reader.

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Malika and her Nana see a pair of dazzling shoes perched in the window, and Malika is enamored. Her grandma later surprises Malika with the shoes.  She quickly tries them on and tests them out.  She keeps them safe from the rain and dances with them on at her Auntie’s wedding.  She kicks her cousin Jamal with them on, under the table at Christmas when he tries to steal her biscuit.

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She stomps away from her best friend in her red shoes, and jumps double Dutch with them on when she makes up with her friend at her birthday party. But at Nana’s birthday, “the shoes don’t let her forget that her feet have grown.” Nana and Malika take the shoes to the thrift store to be resold.  A sad Malika says goodbye to them, they were her favorite shoes ever.

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Inna Ziya sees the shoes in the window and knows just the little girl who will love them.  She squeezes them in to her suitcase and they are off to Africa. They wait under a table selling claypots in a market waiting for the girl who fasted half the month of Ramadan.

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When Amina comes holding her mother’s hand, Auntie Inna Ziya delivers the promised gift.  Amina thinks they are beautiful and lovingly carries them in the box on her lap as they fide the tro-tro home.  Amina’s little sister Halima, can’t wait to see the gift as she too hopes to one day fast in Ramadan.

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Amina lets her try them on and when she outgrows them she plans to pass them on to her.  Meanwhile, Malika is wondering whatever happened to her beautiful red shoes, and if someone else is wearing them.

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There is no mention of Islam nor is Ramadan explained.  There are women in hijab in America and in Africa, even in the books in a shop window there is representation.  I particularly love the shout-out in the illustrations to “Mommy’s Khimar.”

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The front of the book has Malika, and the back, Amira.

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Baby’s First Ramadan by Clare Lloyd design and illustrations by Eleanor Bates

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Baby’s First Ramadan by Clare Lloyd design and illustrations by Eleanor Bates

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I was excited to see publishing company DK add this Ramadan book to their board book selection, but overall it didn’t wow me, or even really impress me.  It has realistic pictures of diverse Muslims celebrating Ramadan, simple text, and bright images, but it read awkward as it switched between first and third person, realistic and stock looking images, and not terribly enticing with slightly faded mehndi and unexplained foods.  There are better board books out there for babies and toddlers than this 12 page mainstream published one.  If you can find it at the library, sure check it out, but I’d save my money on purchasing it.

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The book starts out saying Muslims follow Islam and Ramadan is a special month in Islam.  It features a a man holding a little girl and both are people of color.  The opposite page is a cartoonish crescent moon saying it is the start of Ramadan.

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The next page has a plate of realistic deviled eggs on a bright background stating that many Muslims fast, don’t eat from sunrise to sunset.  It also states that the meal before dawn is called suhoor or sehri.  I’m not sure why Urdu is included with the traditional Arabic and no other languages are mentioned.

The next page then shows a little girl praying and switches to present tense first person and says “Let’s pray…” followed by a little boy reading Quran and stating that reading Quran helps us learn about Islam.  It then switches back to declarative 3rd person saying that people break their fasts before sunset prayers and shows a bowl of dates.

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A family is then shown breaking their fast with a meal known as iftar and the reader is urged to pick their favorite sweet to eat from a plate of different shaped baklava.  There is no description about the baklava and I don’t know how enticing they would be if you have never tasted it before.

The book concludes with the same cartoonish night sky and silhouetted masjids saying the crescent has been seen, Ramadan is over and tomorrow is Eid.  The last page is a girls hand saying , “Let’s celebrate Eid by making henna patterns on our hands.”

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I think the idea is good, but I feel like it doesn’t answer many questions about Ramadan and Muslims and probably makes the religion and celebrations seem foreign and odd, presumably the opposite effect.  I admittedly haven’t read the other holiday books in the series and am not a baby expert, so perhaps I’m really critical and missing the developmental reasoning behind the presentation.  But I don’t know that this book is fun or really informative for any age, it just seems random.

My First Book About Allah: Teachings for Toddlers and Young Children by Sara Khan illustrated by Ali Lodge

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My First Book About Allah: Teachings for Toddlers and Young Children by Sara Khan illustrated by Ali Lodge

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This 26 page non fiction sturdy board book packs in a lot of information in a really simple way that will keep little one’s attention and hopefully encourage them to ask deeper questions as they grow.  The illustrations are soft and alternate between detailed familiar scenes and simple background style scenes that draw attention to the text on the page. It covers the Shahadah, who Allah (swt) is, it mentions that He has 99 names,  that He sent us the Quran and the final messenger is Prophet Muhammad (saw).  The book at times is wordy, and perhaps the vocabulary a bit above a toddlers level, but the flow is smooth and the tone is warm, inviting, and is requested often by my little ones. (It is reasonably priced by at small bookstores, and double the price on Amazon).

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The book starts off by stating that Muslims believe that there is only one God and His name is Allah.  It shows it in Arabic as well on a very muted background.  The next page is much more lively with illustrations showing someone pray, a picture of the ka’aba, a family eating, and a mother reading Quran and making dua.

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The family is then depicted gathered together with the little children asking “WHO is Allah?” and the book dedicating the next few pages to explaining that Allah swt, is the One who made everything and has power over all. He makes the sun rise and set and everything in the heavens and the earth belong to Him.

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The book explains that Allah even loves us more than our own parents before explaining that Allah has 99 names and Ar-Rahman and Ar-Rahim are the ones we hear the most.  The background has many of the names of Allah written in Arabic.

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The family prays knowing Allah is All Hearing and All Seeing.  An illustration of a cave with a bird and spiderweb accompany the page that tells us that He sent us the Qur’an and Prophet Muhammad (saw) to show us how to live. InshaAllah if we do as we are supposed to, we are promised paradise and Allah never breaks His promise.

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The book concludes with Facts about Allah and Questions about Allah (swt). The pages are glossy and 6 x 8 in size.

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Good Little Wolf by Nadia Shireen

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Good Little Wolf by Nadia Shireen

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I have way too many conflicting thoughts for this 32 page AR 2.1 Muslim authored picture book.  The good little wolf, with a cast of familiar story book characters getting cameos, is choppy in its simple story telling to the point I thought pages had been skipped more than once, funny in asking the three little pigs permission to blow their houses down, slightly moral in elevating good behavior and having the courage to hold to your goodness, and ultimately, possibly really dark, as the end gives reason to believe that wolves will be wolves and the good little wolf is no more, as in he has been killed along with an old granny too.  

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Rolf is a good little wolf that likes to bake, eat his vegetable and be nice to his friend.  His best friend Mrs. Boggins has warned him that not all wolves are as nice as he is and Rolf hopes he will never meet a big bad wolf.

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Alas, he does meet the Big Bad Wolf, and he questions if Rolf is a wolf at all.  To prove that he is a wolf he accepts the big bad wolf’s challenges:  He howls or rather whistles at the moon and he tries to blow his friend pig’s house in.  Eventually he resolves that he isn’t mean enough to be a wolf, then the Big Bad Wolf gives him one more chance as he holds out a fork and knife to the wolf while restraining Mrs. Boggins. D31DC212-C85D-439B-BBCF-2A1CEA6F1FF8

Rolf feels something deeply and ties up the Big Bad Wolf feeling more wolf like than ever.  He just happens to be a good little wolf.  To celebrate they all sit down for a snack and the Big Bad Wolf decides to stop eating people…tomorrow.

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Yeah, it isn’t clear and could be up for debate, but Rolf and Mrs. Boggins are no longer at the table, and the Big Bad Wolf looks pretty happy.

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There is nothing religious in the book, it could be debated if the book is dark or just silly and aside from the choppiness of the transitions, overall the book is a fun turn on classic characters and concepts.

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Five Pillars Just to Please Allah by Rabia Bashir and Amir Al-Zubi

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Five Pillars Just to Please Allah by Rabia Bashir and Amir Al-Zubi

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This adorable 8×8 board book for little Muslims is perfect for toddlers to Kindergarteners.  My one year old loves toting it around and looking at the pictures, while my 5 year old likes reading the book independently and lifting the flaps at the end to quiz himself.  I’m normally really against liftable flaps in board books, but thus far my little one hasn’t ripped them all off, so I’ll spare y’all my repetitive rant.

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The 10 pages of text are perfect to identify the five pillars to the tune of “Row, row, row, your boat” and get little ones familiar with the terms.  The illustrations give older kids something to discuss as they show diversity, the pillars in action and are bright, glossy, and engaging.

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The publisher’s website seems to have changed, it was preciousbees.com but now seems to be bismillahbees.com and song of the book can be found here: https://youtu.be/F2hHvDFSVz8

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I got my copy from Crescent Moon Store and can’t speak highly enough of their great customer service and selection.  

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The flaps at the end are fairly small which inshaAllah will extend their life.

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The Adventures of Adam and Anisah: The Flying Carpet by Zahra Patel illustrated by Reyhana Ismail

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The Adventures of Adam and Anisah: The Flying Carpet by Zahra Patel illustrated by Reyhana Ismail

 

img_6995I am confident that every Muslim child has imagined their prayer rug at one time or another to be a flying carpet, so how absolutely heart filling as an adult to find a book that embraces this idea, roots it in Islamic fact and presents it so beautifully for our littlest Muslim believers.

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The occasionally rhyming and constantly cadence filled picture book features a big brother preparing for and performing salat as his enamored little sister puts imagination and celebration to the act of worship.

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I absolutely love the admiration that Anisah has for her big brother and am delighted how prayer is presented not as an obligation but as an opportunity to soar and marvel in amazement.

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The book concludes with a section that provides context to the story, questions to discuss, and ways to extend the learning.  The hardback binding, 8.5 x 13 horizontal orientation and high glossy illustrations make the book a joy in small groups and at bedtime.

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This book is really, really well done in its simplicity, and I need to order the other book in the series, My Brother’s Shield from Crescent Moon Book Store, as soon as possible.