Tag Archives: celebrate

10 Things I Love about Ramadan by Firhana Imam illustrated by Ali Gator

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10 Things I Love about Ramadan by Firhana Imam illustrated by Ali Gator

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After a while a lot of Ramadan books seem repetitive with the information being more or less the same, this 24 page kindergarten and up book however, manages to present the information in a numbered format that allows for the information to flow without being constrained by an overly forced story.  The result is a fun little read that children will enjoy as they master some of the key concepts of Ramadan.  This book doesn’t have activities at the end, but would lend itself very easily to games, memorization challenges and discussion topics if read frequently for even the littlest Muslims. It would also work as an introduction to the month for non Muslims.  I know I get asked a lot for suggestions of books to be read to children’s classes in public schools, and this would definitely work for that too.

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The book starts out with an introduction to Nabeela as this is her list of 10 things that she loves about Ramadan.  She starts with Assalamu Alaikum before diving in with some facts and getting started with number one.  Each number is a two page illustrated spread, there are footnotes for any Arabic or religious terms used, and the bright colors and large fonts make the book easy for early readers to follow along with and attempt on their own.

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She starts by loving the new moon that her family looks for before the start of Ramadan. She loves Suhur: helping prepare for it the night before and eating her favorite pancakes early in the morning.

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Number 3 is iftar.  She loves pies and samosas and explains to us that she always has dates and water because that is the Sunnah.  Along the way she shares her love of family, making du’a because a fasting person’s du’as are always accepted, and reading Qur’an even though it is difficult because she knows she will get more rewards for trying so hard.

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She also loves Tarawih prayer whether at the mosque or at home, and the peacefulness of Lailatul Qadr.  She loves that her father and brother stay at the mosque the last ten nights of Ramadan in Itikaf and finally at number 10 is Eid!

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The book concludes with some verses from the Qur’an about Ramadan in English.  I thoroughly am impressed at how succinctly so much is conveyed and the adorable manner in which it is done, Alhumdulillah!

The Adventures of Adam and Anisah: The Flying Carpet by Zahra Patel illustrated by Reyhana Ismail

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The Adventures of Adam and Anisah: The Flying Carpet by Zahra Patel illustrated by Reyhana Ismail

 

img_6995I am confident that every Muslim child has imagined their prayer rug at one time or another to be a flying carpet, so how absolutely heart filling as an adult to find a book that embraces this idea, roots it in Islamic fact and presents it so beautifully for our littlest Muslim believers.

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The occasionally rhyming and constantly cadence filled picture book features a big brother preparing for and performing salat as his enamored little sister puts imagination and celebration to the act of worship.

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I absolutely love the admiration that Anisah has for her big brother and am delighted how prayer is presented not as an obligation but as an opportunity to soar and marvel in amazement.

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The book concludes with a section that provides context to the story, questions to discuss, and ways to extend the learning.  The hardback binding, 8.5 x 13 horizontal orientation and high glossy illustrations make the book a joy in small groups and at bedtime.

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This book is really, really well done in its simplicity, and I need to order the other book in the series, My Brother’s Shield from Crescent Moon Book Store, as soon as possible.  

Hassan and Aneesa Celebrate Eid by Yasmeen Rahim illustrated by Omar Burgess

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So, cute, mashaAllah, I remember last year when I read about these two siblings celebrating Ramadan how pleasantly surprised I was by their relatable sweet story, and once again, I am thrilled that such a little book packs so much information in a fictionalized story to smile at.  Really its size is my only criticism, the book is tiny in size at 7 inches by 8.  The length of 24 pages is fine, its just hard to read it to a group, and really is only ideal for bedtime (not that I won’t read it to a group of kids, its just hard).  Even the price is fabulous, alhumdulillah, and also available in the public library.  Overall, the book is pretty sweet.

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Hassan and Aneesa are getting ready for Eid after a month of fasting.  Their parents are having a party so there is a lot to do to get ready, cleaning, cooking, sampling food, and wrapping gifts. The morning of eid is chaos with everyone running around (so relatable)!  They finally are out the door and heading to the park to pray outside, following Prophet Muhammad’s example.  They listen to the imam give a speech about sharing food and then its off to hug everyone and wish one another an Eid Mubarak.

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When everyone heads to the siblings home, you see kids having fun, dad cooking, and presents being exchanged.  After everyone leaves, they take food to the neighbors, as the imam reminded and the fictional family concludes a wonderful eid that they don’t want to end.

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There is a glossary at the back and the pictures are colorful, bright, and expressive.  While there isn’t a plot or any character development, the situations the kids find themselves are relatable.  The joking that Aneesa will help her mom by sampling the food, and the picture at the end of the kids playing in a messy room with the parents passed out from exhaustion on the couch is pretty fun. 

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There are a few books out there that timeline an eid day, but this one does it well. Kids two and up will enjoy the excitement and feel ready to celebrate eid themselves.  It shows the holiday as fun and desirable and something to look forward to.  Because the kids are in a handful of books, it also does create some identity confidence, as kids see themselves in the various situations that Aneesa and Hassan explore.

Eid by Maria Migo

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This linear story works great for toddlers that might not remember what a typical eid day is like, or those that do well to know what to expect.  There isn’t a ton of detail, but each page has a sentence or two that move the story from spotting the moon, to putting on new clothes, going for prayers, opening presents, and falling asleep at the end of the day dreaming of next year.

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The gentle pictures convey that Eid is a time of family and love, but don’t necessarily convey that chaos and excitement of the day.  The kids are smiling, as are their parents, and the interaction is playful and safe.  I feel like this book is really ideal for kids with anxiety or that need some reassurance when their daily schedule is altered.  For kindergarten kids and older for the most part, I think they might find the book a glorified timeline list.  After one reading, I’m sure they will not ask for another nor remember much from the 32 page book.

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As seems to be the unwritten rule for books like this, the story is framed through a brother sister duo, however the simplicity of the text doesn’t name them, nor give them any role other then to show what an Eid day is like.  

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I like that they do go to the mosque and that it remarks that it is a little squished.  I also like that it mentions Eid is in summer, and implies that it isn’t always, something that could be discussed with older readers.  It doesn’t clarify if it is Eid al Fitr or Eid al Adha, so it would work for both.  The hard back binding and size are beautiful and ideal for story time and bedtime.  

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It isn’t my favorite book, but there is nothing wrong with it.  The Muslim Children’s Books publisher seems to have changed the cover, I’m not sure if anything else has changed.  The book would be a great addition to a book shelf, or in an Eid basket, but I don’t know that it has the wow-power to be a great stand alone gift or book to generate excitement for the blessed holiday.