Tag Archives: Eid

Eid al-Adha: Festivals Around the World by Grace Jones

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Eid al-Adha: Festivals Around the World by Grace Jones

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I had hoped to go through all the recently published non fiction hajj and Eid al-Adha books at my local library, the same way I went through the Ramadan and Eid al-Fitr ones to check for errors and accuracy, but they really didn’t have many, and those that they did have were not published in the last few years.  I did find this book from 2017 and because it has some errors: saying Eid is in September every year, not mentioning all the parts of Hajj, which is ok, but overly stressing the stoning at the jamarat, pronouncing Hajj as Harj, etc.,  I thought to share it with you all, so that you too can contact the publisher and your local library and/or bookstore to see about pulling it if you are so inclined (booklifepublishing.com)

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The 24 page non fiction book is a large 9.5×12 horizontal layout with beautiful pictures of diverse Muslims worshipping and celebrating.  A little cartoon character, Noor, guides you to word pronunciation with a glossary at the end.img_2346The book starts out with a two page spread defining what a festival is.  The next two pages define Islam.   Page 8 then states that “Eid al-Adha is a festival celebrated by Muslims in September of every year.”  And page 9 of the book says we throw pebbles at a wall, not that we throw pebbles at three representative pillars.  It also says that Eid is celebrated for two to four days depending on the country.  Religiously, it should say it is a three day holiday.

img_2347It then tells the Story of Eid al-Adha aka Ibrahim (as) being to told to sacrifice his son.  I’m not sure why the book doesn’t says that Muslim’s consider Ibrahim a Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him), and instead call him a wise man.  Indeed he was, but it seems very awkward to not mention how Muslims regard him, and seems to go out of its way to not say he is a prophet in Islam.

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The next section is about Hajj which tells that it is performed in the last month of the Islamic year and that we walk around the kaaba seven times.  No other info is given, but in the next section it again mentions the throwing of pebbles,  really dismissing any other steps and making the sacrifice and stoning rituals seem to be the whole of Hajj which is incredibly misleading and erroneous.

The book shows that those not at Hajj, pray in congregation wearing new clothes, give and receive gifts and giving charity.  In the section about Festive Food it only Buriyani from India is featured, it seems random.  It should have been stronger that one third of the sacrifice goes to the poor, one third to friends and family, and one can be kept for oneself.  This would show that meat is the highlighted festival foods in any culture celebrating.  On the “Noor Says” page at the end, it has Hajj pronounced as “harj” which is wrong, it is Hajj, or possibly hadj.

My standards have dropped considerably, and would sadly not consider much of this major.  But, it does provide another example of how involved and aware we need to be in our representation in mainstream nonfiction publications.

Rumaysa: A Fairytale by Radiya Hafiza illustrated by Rhaida El Touny

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Rumaysa: A Fairytale by Radiya Hafiza illustrated by Rhaida El Touny

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This middle grades retelling of the classic fairytales: Rapunzel, Cinderella, and Sleeping Beauty, replaces white characters with diverse Desi characters, reclaims female characters’ empowerment, and weaves the stories together with Rumaysa first freeing herself, and then using a magic necklace that takes her to those in need  (Cinderayla and Sleeping Sara) in her quest to find her long lost parents.  After a few chapters, I started writing a list of gaping-huge-ginormous plot holes, they are frequent and laughable, then I took a deep breath and recalled the similar eye-rolling inconsistencies that plague perhaps all fairy tales, but specifically Disney-esque ones. Once I let go of trying to understand why Rumaysa is wearing hijab while locked in an isolated tower, or how the witch can’t remember her name, but Rumaysa knows the name her parents gave her when she was kidnapped on the day of her birth, or that she knows she was kidnapped and her whole backstory, just to name a few, the book was much more enjoyable.  I still have major issues with some of the forced Islamization and cultural tweaks, but not because they existed, but rather because they weren’t strong enough.  Why have an Eid ball for all the fair maidens in the land.  It was awkward to read all the young people showing up to pair off, and then people asking the prince to dance, and him saying he didn’t know if he could.  Why not just make it an over the top Desi wedding with families, where dancing and moms working to pair their kids off is the norm. Having it be a ball for the maidens in the land, just seemed like it was afraid to commit to the premise of twisting the fairytales completely.  There are a few inconsistencies, however, that I cannot overlook.  This is a mainstream published books and there is at least one spelling error and grammar mistake.  I could be wrong, as it is British, and I am by no means competent in even American English, but I expect better.  Even content wise, Prince Harun for example, is wearing a mask, but the text comments on his blushing cheeks, eyes, eyelashes, and smile, not a typical mask perhaps? And don’t get me started on the  illustrations, the same awkward ball has Ayla leaving, and in the picture not wearing a mask concealing her face as the text states.  Overall, the inside illustrations are not well done.  The cover, by artist Areeba Siddique is beautiful with the shimmery leafing on the edges, that would have brought the inside pages a lot more depth and intrigue than the ones it contains.  Despite all the aforementioned glimpses of my critiques to follow, I didn’t hate the book and quite enjoyed the light handed morals and feminism that was interwoven with clever remarks and snark. The first story has Rumaysa wearing hijab, finding a book about salat and praying.  The second story takes place on Eid and Ayla eats samosas, discusses Layla and Majnun, and has a duputta. The third story I don’t recall any culture or religious tidbits other than keeping with the consistency of cultural names.  There is mention of romance between an owl who has a crush on a Raven, but the heroines themselves are learning to be self sufficient from errors of their parents/guardians and are not looking for any males to save them.  Other than that the book really needs an editor and new illustrations, I can see fairytale loving middle grade kids reading the book and finding it enjoyable, or even younger children having it read aloud to them a few chapters at a time, and being drawn in to the stories and eager to see what happens next. It would work for that demographic, but perhaps no one else.

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SYNOPSIS: (spoilers)

Rumaysa’s parents steal vegetables from a magical garden when there is no food or work to be found, as a result when Rumaysa is born, the owner of the garden, an evil witch, takes Rumaysa and places her in a tower protected by an enchanted forest and a poisonous river.  No one can get in, and Rumaysa cannot get out.  In the tower Rumaysa reads, no idea how she learned, and spins straw in to gold as she sings a song that channels the magic she consumed in utero from the stolen garden.  With only rations of oats to eat, a friendly owl named Zabina frequents Rumays daily and brings her berries and news .  When he brings her a new hijab, Rumaysa has the idea to lengthen the hijab with bits of gold over time, so that she might escape.  When she finally gets her chance, she is met by a boy on a magic carpet named Suleiman, and is both shocked and annoyed that someone got close to the tower, and only after she saved herself.  The two however, and Zabina, are caught by the witch and must escape her as well.  When that is all said and done, Suleiman gives Zabina a necklace that takes one to someone in need of help.  His parents want him to save a princess, he wants to study in his room, so he hands off the necklace hoping it will help Rumaysa find her parents, and he heads off on his flying carpet.

The necklace doesn’t transport Rumaysa to her parents, however, it takes her to a street where a girl is throwing rocks in desperation having been denied attending an Eid ball after her dress was torn to shreds.  The story starts with Ayla’s back story before Rumaysa arrives, but the two girls befriend each other, Rumaysa uses her magic gold weaving abilities to conjure up a new and beautiful dress and golden shoes and the girls head to the ball.  When Ayla heads off to get samosas she meets the prince, but doesn’t know he is the prince.  They argue about the play Layla and Majnun and when her stepmother asks about the dress, Rumaysa and Ayla make a run for it.  A shoe is lost, the stepmother comes to know, the guards search for the missing girl, and all is well.  Except Harun is incredibly shallow and superficial and only interested in Ayla’s clothes and status, so she rejects him and points out that she is much too young for marriage.  She instead reclaims her home, fixes her relationship with her stepsisters and begs Rumaysa to stay.  Rumaysa makes her excuses and is whisked away to a land that is being ruled by a man and his dragons.

Originally the land of Farisia is ruled by King Emad and Queen Shiva, but they have become unjust and disconnected from their people.  When Azra gets a chance to steal Princess Sara and take the kingdom, he does.  Rumaysa arrives to free a sleeping Sara from the dragon and restore apologetic and reformed leaders to the thrown.

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WHY I LIKE IT:

I do like the spinning of familiar stories and either updating them, or twisting them, or fracturing them, so I am glad to see an Islamic cultural tinge available.  I feel like the first story was the strongest conceptually even if the details and morals weren’t well established.  The second story was strong in the messaging that Ayla, and any girl, is more than just a pretty dress, but the premise was a little shaky and not that different from the original.  The third story was a little lacking developmentally for me and all three I felt could have gone stronger in to the religion and culture without alienating readers or becoming heavy.  There are characters illustrated in hijab, some in saris, some in flowing robes. Princess Sara is noted to be a larger body type and I appreciated that in elevating the heroines, other’s weren’t put down.  Even within the book, there is diversity which is wonderful.  

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FLAGS:

There is lying and stealing with consequences.  “Shut up” is said.  There is magic, death, destruction, and a brief mention of an avian crush.

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TOOLS FOR LEADING THE DISCUSSION:

I could see this being used in a classroom for a writing assignment to urge students to write their own tales.  I think it is fourth or fifth grade that children read fairytales from different points of view: think the three little pigs from the wolf’s perspective or the Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales, and this book would lend itself easily to that lesson as well.

Elisha the Eid Fairy by Daisy Meadows (Rainbow Magic)

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Elisha the Eid Fairy by Daisy Meadows (Rainbow Magic)

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If you are familiar with the Rainbow Magic fairy books, you know they are never ending, there are currently 228 titles in the collection that cover beginning readers, early chapter books, and longer solo chapter books.  They cover seasons, colors, flowers, jewels, musical instruments, pets, friends, holidays, etc., and now festivals.  They may not be the most intellectually stimulating, but they serve a purpose in getting young readers confident and engaged.  My daughter loved them in first and second grade and when this book was delivered a few days ago, she was so excited to see a Muslim fairy.  She is 14.  Representation will always matter, even when the story is a bit hokey and random, to see yourself in a beloved series, has power.  Yes, the story is predictable in the 80 drawing filled pages, but for first and second graders it is fun.  Elisha wears western clothes with her hijab, has a magical Pelita lamp that brings Eid joy to the human world, and hosts feasts with international foods.  Yes, the fairy is Muslim and Eid joy after Ramadan comes from an oil lamp apparently, it is a stretch, and if you are not comfortable with this imaginative representation of Eid joy coming from a magical creature’s enchanted item, then please don’t waste your time.  If your kids already read books about fairies, this book might be of great delight to them, and be a great conversation starter for you to have about what really makes Eid a joyous time.

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SYNOPSIS:

Jack Frost is still determined in this the third book in the four part festival series, to cancel Eid, Diwali, Hanukkah and Buddha Day to create his own Frost Day.  With the sighting of the new moon, in this book Eid is under attack.  Humans Rachel and Kirsty are summoned to help find Elisha the Eid Fairy’s magical Pelita lamp.  But, Elisha goes missing and the girls arrive on Festival Island to find goblins destroying the Eid decorations.  The fairyies divide up and Rachel and Kirsty in their fairy form are off to find Elisha, while the other fairies handle the goblins.  They find her in a tower surrounded by a hail storm, the can’t get her out unless they find her wand.  Once they find her wand they have to find her magical item.  The goblins have it and are trying to teach it to make Frost Day treats instead of the kleichas and baklava and turkish delight that it keeps creating.  With quick thinking, and an impromptu dance lesson, the lamp is recovered, Eid joy is saved, and the girls return to the human world, knowing that one more festival will need saving in the near future.

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WHY I LIKE IT:

First of all, I didn’t know what a pelita lamp or kleichas were, so I did learn something once I Googled it, but I’m not entirely convinced that a pelita lamp (sometimes it is capitalized and sometimes it isn’t) is critical to the celebration of Eid.  Aside from the religious uncomfortableness of attributing Eid joy to a magical creature and her enchanted item, the concept of the lamp seems a bit weak.  I like that information about Ramadan is included and Eid Mubarak is mentioned a few times, but a little bit more about a lamp or lantern perhaps as a cultural relic, would have really made more sense even in this fragile framework.  

I like that multiple cultures are represented in the concept of Eid and Elisha, she isn’t boxed in to one culture, she is universal.  The themes of team work and friendship are always present in these books which is a great way to show respect for multiple religions and festivals.  Jack Frost at times seems to be a good villain, but more in theory than in reality.  His spell that the fairies are trying to break:  “Ignore Eid and Buddha Day, Make Diwali go away.  Scrap Hanukkah and make them see- They should be celebrating me!  I’ll steal ideas and spoil their fun. My Frost Day plans have just begun.  Bring gifts and sweets to celebrate The many reasons I’m so great!” spells out his plans and make him the right amount of scary for early readers.

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FLAGS:

The premise of where Eid joy comes from.  The goblins say “shut up” at one point.

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TOOLS FOR LEADING THE DISCUSSION:

It is a little young for a book club selection, but if you have Rainbow Magic books on your shelf, you should definitely have this one too.

 

Too Small Tola by Atinuke illustrated by Onyinye Iwu

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Too Small Tola by Atinuke illustrated by Onyinye Iwu

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This AR 3.6, 89 page early chapter book features three stories set in Lagos, Nigeria.  The main character and her family are Christian, but many of the neighbors are Muslim, and the third story is set in Ramadan with Easter and Eid falling at the same time.  The sense of community throughout the book, the OWN voice detail and charm make this book silly, warm, and delightful for first through third grade readers.

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SYNOPSIS:

In the first story Tola heads to the market with her Grandmommy.  Not the fancy mall, but the muddy market further away.  Her older brother Dapo is too busy playing soccer to help, her older sister Moji is busy with homework, that leaves little Tola to carry the items on her head with her tough as nails little grandmother.  Everyone says she is too small, but Grandmommy knows she can do it.  As they purchase the items, and neighbors call to have them pick up items for them too, the duo have to take lots of breaks on their way home, but Too Small Tola does it and proves to herself and others that she might be small, but she is strong.

The second story once again focuses on life in Lagos and the one bedroom apartment the family shares.  One morning both the power and the water are out and the jerry bottles need to be filled at the pump.  When some bullies trip Tola and the water spills, an elderly neighbor lady patiently waits for the right time to get her revenge on Tola’s behalf, and when the bully challenges the woman, the entire line stands together.  Tola may be small, but she stood for something and made a difference.

The final story involves the neighbor, Mr. Abdul, the tailor who lives downstairs, coming to measure Tola and her family for their new Easter clothes.  He let Tola measure everyone last year and praises her as the best measurer in Lagos, and Tola is eager to take the measurements this year.  When the tailor breaks his leg, he is worried he will not be able to ride his bicycle to his clients and will not be able to prepare the Eid feast and pay rent.  Tola knows they have been fasting all Ramadan and between her, Grandmommy, and Dapo they come up with a plan to help.  Dapo will peddle the bike and take Tola to measure everyone for their orders.  Tola may be small, but she can save the day for the Abdul family.

WHY I LIKE IT:

I love little Tola and her sassy grandma.  The book would lend itself so wonderfully to be read aloud as it bursts with personality and dialogue.  I love the sense of community in such a day-to-day life that would seem to stark and hard to most western readers.  Tola’s draws on those around her to find her strength, from her Grandmommy, to her neighbors, they may tease her that she is too little, but they also build her back up and stand with her.  I love the diversity in Tola’s world.  She seems so excited that Eid and Easter will be aligned and that after her services they will be joining the Abdul’s feast, such a great lesson of tolerance and respect without being preachy about tolerance and respect.  Young readers will enjoy Tola and the insight into Nigeria.

FLAGS:

Grandmommy lies when a neighbor calls her in the market to ask her to pick up his TV, she pretends the battery dies as she and Tola laugh at how ridiculous them carrying a TV would be in addition to everything else they are carrying.  There is bullying when Tola is tripped and then when Mrs. Shaky-Shaky trips the bully.

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TOOLS FOR LEADING THE DISCUSSION:

This wouldn’t work for a book club, but would be ideal in small groups, or to be read aloud.  There would be a lot to discuss as children would relate to Tola and find themselves cheering her on.

‘Tis The Night Before Eid by Yasmin Rashidi illustrated by Mariam Aldacher

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On the surface this 32 page inspired re-imagining of the classic Christmas poem might not seem that impressive, but it is really quite effective in highlighting general key points of Ramadan, the mix of sadness that Ramadan has gone too quickly with the excitement of Eid, and showing the diversity of Muslim families and communities.  The large 8 x 10 hard bound pages showcase fun and relatable illustrations that would help inform those unfamiliar with the holiday, while also mirroring and encouraging Ramadan and Eid excitement.  It is already a favorite at our house and with simple rhyming lines, the book can lend itself easily to more in-depth discussions (there is a glossary at the back) or be kept as a sweet flowing story that you don’t mind reading repeatedly at the prodding of toddlers and preschoolers alike.

img_8997The story starts with it being the night before Eid.   Ramadan has flown by, iftar eaten, dishes are put away, trips to the masjid for Taraweh have concluded and now it is time to prepare for Eid.  The house is cleaned, clothes ironed, sweets prepared and dreams of gifts filling the kids minds.

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The narrative bounces back to Ramadan to explain that fasting is not eating til sundown for 30 days, that Quran was revealed during the blessed month and that we hold on to the lessons of Ramadan all year long.

 

I pre-ordered mine from the author’s website https://rashidibooks.com/home , but it is also available at Crescent Moon Store https://crescentmoonstore.com/products/twas-the-night-before-eid.  There are also printables on the author’s website.

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Zara’s New Eid Dress by Nafisah Abdul-Rahim

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Zara’s New Eid Dress by Nafisah Abdul-Rahim

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The search is on for an eid dress that reflects Zara’s African American Muslim culture.  This much needed representation highlights more of looking for a dress and the process of having one made, than providing information about Eid or the African American Muslim experience over its 30 pages.  Iftar is mentioned on one page in parentheses, so if you omit that word it could reflect either Eid preparation.  The book is cute if you are looking for a slice of life and coming together of a child, mother, and grandmother over the creation of a dress that has what Zara is wanting: pink, fluffy and containing flowers.  It falls short if you are looking for a book to learn about Eid, Ramadan, what a cultural African American Muslim dress would look like, or a peek into an under represented culture.  The illustrations are sufficient.  I felt the girl looked younger in some of the depictions, and I was surprised that the girl’s rain boots and clothes were worn over multiple days in her search for a dress, picking out fabric and inside her house when the dress is completed.  Similarly, on Eid day while her dress is stunning and fabulous, her friends are wearing the same eid clothes they wore at the start of the book from years past.

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Zara has worn a salwar kameez from Pakistan with her friend Sana, an abaya like her friend Noura one year too, but this Eid, she wants a dress that shows “her own style, her heritage, a reflection of her culture as an African American Muslim.  As her mom is preparing iftar she asks when they can start shopping for her Eid dress.  She knows it won’t be easy to find and convinces her mother to start looking this weekend.

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She pulls on her rainboots as they head out the door to find “something bright, pink, fluffy, and has flowers on it.” They go to several stores and kind find anything just right.  Her mom suggests asking Nana to make it.  Zara’s mom recalls the fabulous dresses her mom used to make her to wear on Eid.

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Nana and Zara head out to the fabric store the next morning. First they find the pattern, then they find the fabric.  After a few days of hard work for Nana, the dress is complete.

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On Eid day, Zara meets up with her friends in her dress that is uniquely her own.

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Ramadan’s Coming by Rabia Bashir illustrated by Laila Ramadhani

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Ramadan’s Coming by Rabia Bashir illustrated by Laila Ramadhani

img_8785I think the illustrations in this 40 page picture song book are my favorite of the new 2021 books.  They are adorable and expressive and a big part of the story that the text alludes to, but doesn’t detail.  They also are a big part of the activities at the end of the book that encourage children to go back and find different Ramadan and Eid concepts to discuss and further understand.  I absolutely love that there is a glossary and a reference page that details and attributes the hadith implied in the simple sing song-y words.  The chorus is to the tune of jingle bells, and while I struggled to maintain the rhythm, the chorus reappears and if you are able to sing the book, your children will love it even more, haha, my voice and lack of rhythm forced me to read it, but either way it is absolutely delightful and informative for toddlers and up.

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It starts out with the refrain that Ramadan is here and we will fast and pray and that Allah (swt) will give us more rewards and we will do more good deeds, than on normal days.  It then shares that Ramadan is the month after Shaban when the Qur’an first came down and that we look for the crescent moon to know when Ramadan is here.  It is important to note that the words flow and are so concise you don’t even realize that much information has been conveyed.

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The chorus repeats and shows a family praying, kids helping vacuum, and giving socks to homeless.  The family then wakes up early for a healthy suhoor, no food or drink, thinking about how the poor must feel and then having iftar with a sticky sweet date and water.  Sometimes you eat so much your belly protrudes (a great vocabulary word for little ones). The next page has salat starting and those that ate too much wishing they would have left space for air and water.

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The chorus repeats again showing zakat being given, iftars being eaten in segregated large groups, before looking for Laylat ul Qadr takes place and some children read Qur’an in an itikaf tent. Then it is time for Eid hugs, salams, prayer, food and fun.

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On one page, the grammar of one line seems off, perhaps an extra word was added.  I contacted the author to see if it is an error as it is part of the chorus, but only appears wrong in one place and one time.  Even with the error, I would happily encourage this book for families with toddlers, preschoolers, and kindergarteners.  It will be read multiple times, and the pictures will hopefully offer something new with each reading as understanding increases.

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The copy I purchased from Amazon is 8.5 by 8.5 paperback, I’m not sure if they will be available from the publisher as a board book or without faces like so many of their books are.

10 Things I Love about Ramadan by Firhana Imam illustrated by Ali Gator

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10 Things I Love about Ramadan by Firhana Imam illustrated by Ali Gator

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After a while a lot of Ramadan books seem repetitive with the information being more or less the same, this 24 page kindergarten and up book however, manages to present the information in a numbered format that allows for the information to flow without being constrained by an overly forced story.  The result is a fun little read that children will enjoy as they master some of the key concepts of Ramadan.  This book doesn’t have activities at the end, but would lend itself very easily to games, memorization challenges and discussion topics if read frequently for even the littlest Muslims. It would also work as an introduction to the month for non Muslims.  I know I get asked a lot for suggestions of books to be read to children’s classes in public schools, and this would definitely work for that too.

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The book starts out with an introduction to Nabeela as this is her list of 10 things that she loves about Ramadan.  She starts with Assalamu Alaikum before diving in with some facts and getting started with number one.  Each number is a two page illustrated spread, there are footnotes for any Arabic or religious terms used, and the bright colors and large fonts make the book easy for early readers to follow along with and attempt on their own.

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She starts by loving the new moon that her family looks for before the start of Ramadan. She loves Suhur: helping prepare for it the night before and eating her favorite pancakes early in the morning.

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Number 3 is iftar.  She loves pies and samosas and explains to us that she always has dates and water because that is the Sunnah.  Along the way she shares her love of family, making du’a because a fasting person’s du’as are always accepted, and reading Qur’an even though it is difficult because she knows she will get more rewards for trying so hard.

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She also loves Tarawih prayer whether at the mosque or at home, and the peacefulness of Lailatul Qadr.  She loves that her father and brother stay at the mosque the last ten nights of Ramadan in Itikaf and finally at number 10 is Eid!

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The book concludes with some verses from the Qur’an about Ramadan in English.  I thoroughly am impressed at how succinctly so much is conveyed and the adorable manner in which it is done, Alhumdulillah!

Crayola Ramadan and Eid Al-Fitr Colors by Mari Schuh

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Crayola Ramadan and Eid Al-Fitr Colors by Mari Schuh

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This 32 page non fiction children’s book uses colors to introduce the very basics of Ramadan and Eid from a non Muslim point of view to a non Muslim audience.  The book is done decently and shows diverse Muslims and bright colors interwoven with facts about the month, but by-and-large it is forgetable and just discusses the broader sense of celebration.  There is very little that is religious outside of the photographs showing Muslims that are used to illustrate the book.  Even the concept of colors in a book by Crayola is a little lacking.  Yes, dates are brown, but just to say that “colorful designs cover prayer rugs,” and that “people shop for red and green vegetables, and many orange and brown fruits are used for meals too,” seems really vague and half hearted.  

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The book starts out with explaining what Ramadan is and defines what a crescent moon is in a blurb under a picture of one. It then explains what happens in Ramadan and dedicates two pages to lanterns that are purple, red, blue and green and used to hang in streets and homes.

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It then moves in to the celebrating of Eid Al-Fitr.  It shows children playing and having fun and receiving gifts and toys to celebrate. It talks about the food and mentions colors of the food without naming or describing them, it then does the same for desserts.

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When explaining the clothes that people wear on Eid, it says that sometimes they are colorful. It then repeats that gifts and money are given, but adds in that they are also given to those in need.

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The book concludes with a page that you can copy and color, a glossary, suggestions to learn more, and an index.

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A much better, color driven albeit not Ramadan and Eid specific choice would be Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns: A Muslim Book of Colors  by Hena Khan on in my opinion. Both are widely available in public libraries, maybe check them both out and let me know what you and your children think.

Amira’s Picture Day by Reem Faruqi illustrated by Fahmida Azim

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Amira’s Picture Day by Reem Faruqi illustrated by Fahmida Azim

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This book is the mirror so many kids are desperate to find in literature. A young Muslim girl is excited to celebrate Eid, while at the same time is sad knowing she is missing school picture day with her class. Not knowing what day Eid will be, not having it a scheduled day off in most school districts, and always feeling like you have your foot in two different doors starts early for children in non Muslim majority countries. This early picture book touches on those emotions, and even if you can’t always get a test rescheduled or a project due date moved, at least readers that face these dilemmas at any age and stage in life, will feel seen in this 32 page book perfect for ages 5 and up.

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Amira and her brother Ziyad start the book looking out the window for the moon. They see it, which means Eid is tomorrow and Amira is going to have her mom put decorative Mehndi on her hands. She has her mom include a dolphin in the green swirls and hopes that by morning the color will be dark and beautiful. Ziyad is excited that they get to skip school.

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Mom recruits the two kids to make goody bags and count out lollipops for the kids at the masjid, when the flyer for picture day catches Amira’s attention. Devastated that she will miss the class picture having already picked out a pink-striped dress for the occasion, mom reassures her that she will get to wear her new shalwar kameez, and they will take lots of pictures at the masjid.

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Amira loves going for prayers and the party after, but she is kept awake at night worrying how her classmates will remember her if she isn’t in the picture. The next morning she is excited, it is Eid, but seeing her pink dress hanging next to her blue Eid outfit makes getting dressed a heavy process.

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When they get to the masjid, Amira hardly recognizes it, it is all decorated and everyone looks beautiful. The smell of baked goods makes focusing on her prayers difficult, and after when everyone is taking pictures she remembers what she is missing and feels deflated.

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On the way home Amira works to hold back the tears, when she suddenly has an idea to take the remaining goody bags to her classmates, and maybe catch her class pictures. Her parents agree and they stop at the school.

I won’t spoil if she made it in time, but the kids in her class love her clothes, and her mehndi designs. The book concludes with an Author’s Note, More about Eid and a Glossary.

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I absolutely love the illustrations, little Amira is infectious and endearing. I wish the mom would have been a little more in tune with Amira’s feelings though, she definitely is upset and while I’m glad the family stopped after the Eid party, I feel like more could have been done beforehand to acknowledge Amira’s feelings, and see what could be done to accommodate both activities.

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I love the diversity and brightness of the book to convey the absolute joy and happiness of Eid outside of presents. I think the book works for all children of all backgrounds and is a much needed addition to the repetitive Eid books available.