Tag Archives: funny

My Dad’s Beard by Zanib Mian & Laura Ewing

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My Dad’s Beard by Zanib Mian & Laura Ewing

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I honestly don’t think this 11×11, 32 page book could be any sweeter.  With just a few words on each page the simple sentences convey such love and warmth from a boy to his dad, by way of his beard.

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The boy articulates that his father’s beard is different from his uncle’s and his grandfather’s and that his kisses tickle because of it.  He knows his sister loves his dad’s beard too because she holds it when she is scared.  Grandma says it makes him look like a real man, and the way it looks in the morning, is just silly.

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The author is Muslim, but there is no overt Islamic content or depiction except for the one page that any Muslim would take to reference Prophet Muhammad (saw), see picture below.  Which is a great segue to talking about Rasulullah and his sunnah.

beardThe large bold pictures and simple words make this story perfect for kids a year old and up.  The book definitely deserves a place on every bearded baba’s book shelf.  I challenge you to read this book and not smile, I am confident it will win you over, no matter how many times your little one asks you to read it.

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My only complaint, is that given the size of the book, and how perfect it is for little kids and in story time, the soft pages flop over.  It is impossible to hold the book, read it, and show the pictures in one go, you have to juggle a bit more than one would want. Additionally something to note, is that on the pages where the boy talks about his uncle and granddad, the diction is clearly more British than English. My older kids remarked, but it definitely wasn’t a problem.

Here is a link for the book trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uf7tbvJ5aSw

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zaid and the Gigantic Cloud by Helal Musleh illustrated by Sabrina Pichardo

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Zaid and the Gigantic Cloud by Helal Musleh illustrated by Sabrina Pichardo

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We all experience disappointment and frustration and feeling like a gray cloud is weighing us down, and for Zaid, it really is!  In 36 bright colorful pages, children ages 5 and up can see that bad days happen to everyone, and that sometimes it seems like nothing is going right.

Zaid has been waiting for months for a weekend camping trip with his uncle and cousin, but when Ahmed comes down with the chicken pox, the trip is cancelled.  That night Zaid barely sleeps he is so upset, and in the morning notices a small grey cloud hovering above him.  As he waits for the bus, the autumn leaves remind him that it will soon be too cold to play soccer outside, then he has to sit at the back of the bus, and needless to say its just the beginning of many disappointments in his day, that make the cloud above him grow.  But then, a little something out of the ordinary, in the form of a small bird needing help, presents Zaid with a change of pace and a chance to turn his day around.  Slowly but surely the cloud starts to shrink and Zaid copes with the rest of the day with a bit of perspective and a growing smile.

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The book is a much needed one in showing children coping with emotions in a somewhat autonomous manner.  The book doesn’t judge his feelings, but shows how he finds a way to see the silver lining and make do with a string of frustrations.  The adults don’t lecture him or solve his problems for him, but are definitely supportive and caring should he need them.  The story does a good job of flowing and not getting preachy.  I can’t wait to read it to my 6-year-old who has a gray cloud pop up at the slightest disappointment, but currently my 10-year-old has been sent to her room with the book to see if she can relate Zaid’s predicament with her own.  The handy discussion questions at the end also can help talk about feelings through Zaid, and hopefully making the child’s connection from a fictional character to their own experiences more poignant.

This book really cemented in my head the growing subcategories of Islamic fiction picture books.  Naturally there are books that are geared for Muslim kids only and ones that work for Muslim and non Muslim kids alike.  But this book, along with a few of the new releases like it, cover universal themes with Muslim characters (at least by name) and have diversity in their pictures.  They show a few characters in hijab but do not mention or explain it, in this book the marshmallow package says halal, again with no explanation.  However, there is no specific ayat or hadith that the book stems from or an Islamic pearl that is meant to get through.  The characters do not greet each other with salam, or say alhumdulillah and mashaAllah, making it more appealing to a wider audience, but words I hope when the story is being read aloud to Muslim kids, can be sprinkled in.  I think it is a great addition to the literary world when Muslims are seen in a larger community and is not jarring.  I hope parents of non Muslim children also appreciate this diversity in literature and I pray that it leads to more acceptance in the “real” world, ameen.

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Hamza Learns about Charity by Ameena Chaudhry

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Hamza Learns about Charity by Ameena Chaudhry

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It is hard to believe I haven’t reviewed any of the seven Hamza books in the series.  They are perfect for 2-6 year olds (older kids will enjoy them too), and all are both informative and silly.  This book is 20 pages and is seven and half inch square in shape.

In Hamza Learns About Charity.  Hamza learns what the word charity means as his mom is packing up his old toys to donate to the less fortunate.  He also learns you can give money and how donating and taking care of the poor is required in Islam.  Hamza’s mom tells how Prophet Muhammad (saw) lived a simple life and was very generous with whatever he had.  Hamza also learns the word for charity in Arabic.  When his mom leaves to take the stuff, Hamza decides to show that he understands and is ready to give everything away and live a simple life.  Alhumdulillah, mom returns in time to shoo the neighbors away and convince them that the house, and car, and household items are not for sale.  Thus, Hamza also learns that we aren’t required to give everything away, and when making big decisions we should get our parents’ permission first.

The illustrations are cute and colorful.  They are not overly detailed, but Hamza’s facial expressions are engaging and expressive.  The book works well for story time and bedtime and seems to be geared for Muslim children.

What Does a Muslim Look Like? by Mohamed Abdel-Kader illustrated by Abdullah Badawy

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What Does a Muslim Look Like? by Mohamed Abdel-Kader illustrated by Abdullah Badawy

what does a muslim look like.jpeg This 22 page, simplistic book written in rhyming couplets, is such a timely and necessary book.  Much like Owl and Cat: What Islam Is… this book has value that extends far beyond its audience level (not AR but, I’d say three years and up), as the content breaks down stereotypes while being framed in a positive, non condescending way.

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A brother and sister pair, Jack and Jane, go about their day when at dinner Jack remarks that he learned that two of his classmates are Muslim and they look like them.  Thus arises the question, what do Muslims look like?  The book then goes on to break down stereotypes and broaden views in the same rhyming manner that keeps the book light and child friendly.  The conclusion is that like people of other faiths, everyone is different, and that no one should be judged on what is on the outside.

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The book appears to have been started on Kickstarter in 2012 and Alhumdulillah it got the needed funding to get published.  I got my copy through the public library system, and I am beyond thrilled that I found it where hopefully a lot of people can get their hands on it.  Reading the author’s campaign on where the concept came from, he would have had no idea how much more timely the book is now, then when it was first published.  I get asked quite regularly from old school friends, how they can introduce Islam or get the ball rolling  to talk to their kids about Muslims, and this book would be a great start.  Told from non Muslim kids perspectives, with very hip parents, the book does not discuss any tenants of faith or belief, it just identifies the many shapes and sizes and colors that Muslims come in.  It would work well to show that Muslims are everywhere not just in the news, without overwhelming even the youngest of readers.

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The pictures in the book are absolutely perfect in complimenting the story. They are not only silly, but also diverse as the book’s text would require.  Interestingly there are ladies with hijab and those without, and scarves are not mentioned in the text, and also noteworthy is there are no bearded men in the pictures.  Overall, a wonderful book that I would love to have on my shelf with extras to hand out.

Samira and the Skeletons by Camilla Kuhn

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Samira and the Skeletons by Camilla Kuhn

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Quite possibly there is nothing Islamic about this book, but the main character’s name, Samira, is traditionally an Islamic name and thus it caught my attention.  I also think one could argue that the mom in one of the pictures (see picture below) is possibly wearing a hijab.  So, probably I shouldn’t include it on the blog, but the book is so disturbingly creepy, in a fantastical way, that I thought, why not.

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Samira learns that everyone has a skeleton and bones one day at school, and it frightens her.  She starts seeing everyone’s skulls instead of their outward body parts and she refuses to accept that she has such morbid parts or that her friend Frida does too.  Knowing that she is chewing with teeth, skeleton parts poking through, at lunch is too much and she can’t even be near Frida.  When she gets home she tells her mom she wants to be free of her skeleton, and her mom agrees.  Yes, agrees! They resolve the tooth fairy will be delighted to get a whole skeleton, not just a few teeth.  So the mom, gets some tools and preps a table to perform the surgery required to remove her skeleton.  Luckily Samira runs for it and finds Frida, and alas the girls accept that they have skeletons and use humor to diffuse the fears they have of what lurks beneath their skin.  That is of course until the next day at school comes, and they learn that they have muscles, just like steak.

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The imagination of the girls is quite remarkable.  I love that it starts with a lesson and that information about skeletons and animals, such as jelly fish that don’t have them exist, is sprinkled through out.  I also like the approach, its weird, but in a delightfully fun way.  It also lends itself well to a discussion of how we are more alike than different.  Our outward appearance doesn’t define us when we are all made up of bones and muscles.  The story doesn’t address it, but some kids might infer it or connect the dots with a little prodding.    img_3064

The book is not AR, but I think most 5 year olds and up can read it or follow along giggling all the way through.  It probably isn’t for every child, but those with a darker sense of humor will enjoy all 34 pages.

A Tale from Turkey The Hungry Coat by Demi

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A Tale from Turkey The Hungry Coat by Demi

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It really bothered me that I didn’t love the version I read of  The Parrot and the Turkey about Nasreddin Hodja, especially after finding out how entwined he is in Turkish culture, and reading some of his tales online.  So, when I found that Demi had also rewritten and illustrated a tale from his collection I was anxious to check it out.

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The  Hungry Coat is a charming story and Demi does a great job of bringing it to life with her pictures and storytelling abilities.  The book is 36 pages and a 4.1 on AR.  The text isn’t overwhelming in volume, but to read it definitely requires a bit of an older child’s vocabulary.  Words like caravansary, hostel, banquet, frisky, and commotion are scattered through out.  However, to listen to the story and to understand the message Nasrettin Hoca (an alternate spelling) is conveying, is easily enjoyed by children four and up.  The story flows very smoothly and the catch line of “Eat, coat! Eat!” makes the story absolutely delightful.

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Nasrettin Hoca always keeps an apple in his pocket for any goats he might pass while he is out and about.  One day he helps round-up a goat that has gotten lost, and in all the commotion had become quite a mess and lost too much time to go home and change his clothes before heading to a friend’s house for dinner.  Deciding to go in his patchy, smelly clothes, Nasrettin soon finds that none at the dinner party will sit by him, or even sit facing him.  He slips out quietly from the gathering and has an idea.  He goes home and preens himself, and returns to the party where he is greeted with attention and kindness.  At dinner he begins placing the food in his coat, rather than eating it.  Each time he opens his coat he commands it to eat.  After he fills his coat he pats his belly to the bemusement of all around him as they ask him what he is doing.  He makes his point that when he came in his old coat he wasn’t fed, but when he came dressed so beautifully he was, and thus clearly the coat was invited to dinner, not him.  Everyone cheered and learned the lesson.

“A coat may be fine, but a coat does not make a man.”

The illustrations are rich and detailed, but I did find myself a little put off when Nasrettin seemed to go from looking like an old little man, to being very effeminate.  The inconsistency bothered me a bit, which surprised me for a Demi illustration.  Also, it is worth noting that there is mention of wine in the story, that many may find off for a children’s book, particularly one about Muslims (Nasrettin was an Imam and a Dervish, so he may have drunk, I’m just saying it surprised me).  The last two pages of the book are an afterword about Nasrettin Hoca in real life and the influence of his folk tales and lessons.

Owl & Cat Islam is… by Emma Apple

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Owl & Cat Islam is… by Emma Apple

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The book’s charm is its simplicity.  The text is minimal and the illustrations a small portion of the page.  But at 59 pages the book finds power in showing what Islam is to muslim and non muslim children alike.

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To say that I liked the book is an understatement, I loved it! It is perfect for bedtime and story time for kids 1 to 4.  Ages 5 and up can read it themselves in mere minutes.  The pictures not only are the story, but add a wonderful sprinkling of humor.  I mean really lets eat a mouse, better yet lets share it! EEEW! Oh wait animals and cats do eat mice!

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But why I really like the book, is because while it reminds Muslim children of all the subtle things that make up what Islam is.  It also builds bridges for children who know Muslims, or whose parents want them to widen their knowledge, as it lends it self so effortlessly to seeing how we are all the same.  Yes it mentions the names of Islamic Prayers and that Muslims read the Quran, and tells the five pillars in a non preachy way, but it also says, “Islam is Family,” and “Islam is Respecting our parents” and “Islam is Telling the truth.”  Much more alike than different.  A lesson even the littlest reader can understand and hopefully remember.