Tag Archives: preschool

Jameelah Gets Dressed by

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Jameelah Gets Dressed by

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These books in the Mini Mu’min Dua Series are a great way to introduce familiar concepts in an Islamic framework to preschoolers and teach them the accompanying duas for them.  I previously reviewed Sajaad is Sick, which pleasantly surprised me, and this book proved that the series has consistency and value.

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The pictures are colorful, but basic, there are no faces or people included.  The text rhymes, yet has a nice cadence that doesn’t seem overly forced throughout the 38 pages.  The book is large, 8×10, with a glossary cover, and decent weight and binding.

This book includes a few footnotes: defining hijab, giving the ayats for the commandment to draw your veil over your bodies, the hadith about starting with your right, etc.  There are four duas included, the one for getting dressed, the one for wearing something new, the dua for when someone else wears something new, and the dua for getting undressed.

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Hassan and Aneesa Celebrate Eid by Yasmeen Rahim illustrated by Omar Burgess

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So, cute, mashaAllah, I remember last year when I read about these two siblings celebrating Ramadan how pleasantly surprised I was by their relatable sweet story, and once again, I am thrilled that such a little book packs so much information in a fictionalized story to smile at.  Really its size is my only criticism, the book is tiny in size at 7 inches by 8.  The length of 24 pages is fine, its just hard to read it to a group, and really is only ideal for bedtime (not that I won’t read it to a group of kids, its just hard).  Even the price is fabulous, alhumdulillah, and also available in the public library.  Overall, the book is pretty sweet.

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Hassan and Aneesa are getting ready for Eid after a month of fasting.  Their parents are having a party so there is a lot to do to get ready, cleaning, cooking, sampling food, and wrapping gifts. The morning of eid is chaos with everyone running around (so relatable)!  They finally are out the door and heading to the park to pray outside, following Prophet Muhammad’s example.  They listen to the imam give a speech about sharing food and then its off to hug everyone and wish one another an Eid Mubarak.

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When everyone heads to the siblings home, you see kids having fun, dad cooking, and presents being exchanged.  After everyone leaves, they take food to the neighbors, as the imam reminded and the fictional family concludes a wonderful eid that they don’t want to end.

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There is a glossary at the back and the pictures are colorful, bright, and expressive.  While there isn’t a plot or any character development, the situations the kids find themselves are relatable.  The joking that Aneesa will help her mom by sampling the food, and the picture at the end of the kids playing in a messy room with the parents passed out from exhaustion on the couch is pretty fun. 

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There are a few books out there that timeline an eid day, but this one does it well. Kids two and up will enjoy the excitement and feel ready to celebrate eid themselves.  It shows the holiday as fun and desirable and something to look forward to.  Because the kids are in a handful of books, it also does create some identity confidence, as kids see themselves in the various situations that Aneesa and Hassan explore.

Ilyas and Duck: Ramadan Joy by Omar S. Khawaja illustrated by Leo Antolini

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Ilyas and Duck: Ramadan Joy by Omar S. Khawaja illustrated by Leo Antolini

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The fourth book in the popular Ilyas & Duck series is perfect for instilling joy about Ramadan, and excitement in overcoming Mr. Mean.  But first readers along with Ilyas and Duck, will have to understand what fasting means, realize that it is hard and not all fun, learn some Arabic words and concepts such as compassion, empathy, and gratitude, before they can save the neighborhood from a menacing villain wanting to destroy the blessings of Ramadan.

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As always, with Ilyas and Duck, the rhyming book asks questions that kids think about and is silly in a way that they can relate to.  The illustrations are bright and engaging and the hardback book is 38 pages of fun and information, perfect for ages 5 and up. 

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The book starts with the ayat from the Qur’an that says, “O you who have believed, decreed upon you is fasting as it was decreed upon those before you that you may become righteous” (chapter 2, verse 283).  The book concludes with a mock newspaper spread of the Current Times, full of tidbits about the crescent moon, benefits of fasting, Ilyas and Duck Ramadan cards, a crossword puzzle, and a classified add for Eid Goodie Bags posted by an anonymous, Mr. “M.”

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The book cleverly conveys how a day of Ramadan is practiced without getting preachy.  It shows Ilyas and Duck, praying and eating dates and decorating and getting excited.  the women wear hijab, but nothing about singling out that this is a part of Islam or Muslims is really mentioned.  The reader just is going along with Ilyas and his pal Duck.  It does remark that Allah is the provider and fasting helps build your relationship with Allah, but not to the point that it would seem preachy or alienating to non Muslim children.  Meaning I think you could read this book to your child’s public school class, or scout troop and not have any problems, while similarly giving a Muslim child an awesome story to identify with.

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A lot of the behavior details of what one should and shouldn’t do in Ramadan actually come from Mr. Mean, as he like all villains, lays out his evil plan.  He is hoping to spray a poison that will make kids play instead of pray, and he is leaving cookies around to tempt kids to break their fast.  He is also planning to spread rumors, and encourage gossip, and get kids to make promises they cannot keep.  Alhumdulillah, Sheriff Ilyas and Deputy Duck run him out of town because “there’s no room for meanness, only goodness in Ramadan.”

Owl & Cat Ramadan Is. . . by Emma Apple

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Seventy-four pages, with about that many words, conveying what Ramadan is, and how it is practiced to the youngest of listeners. Emma Apple once again in her simple, yet colorful drawings of Owl and Cat holds toddlers’ interest as she effectively conveys the feeling of what Ramadan is like to muslim and non muslim children.  With so many factual based books about Ramadan and how it is practiced, this nice change of pace shows a lot of the feels and activities in an incredibly streamlined way.

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The book starts with an opening page that tells about Ramadan before establishing the rhythm of each page starting with “Ramadan is…” and then concluding the sentence with one, two or four words to describe the blessed month.

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The illustrations show the two characters doing the things mentioned with their little owl and cat friends, praying, eating, learning, taking naps, etc.. The book is heartfelt, funny, and informative with its sparse wording and simplicity.

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I was thrilled to find it in the public library, and glad to know that there are now more books in the series, alhumdulillah, as well as a workbook to accompany this one.

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Crescent Moons and Pointed Minarets: A Muslim Book of Shapes by Hena Khan illustrated by Mehrdokht Amini

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Crescent Moons and Pointed Minarets: A Muslim Book of Shapes by Hena Khan illustrated by Mehrdokht Amini

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Its probably a good thing I didn’t know that this book was coming out or I would have been waiting very restlessly for its release date.  I love Hena Khan’s Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns and buy it frequently through Scholastic to give as gifts, and this book will definitely follow in its footsteps.

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The pictures are beautiful and vibrant and full of diversity as familiar shapes introduce possibly unfamiliar things.  Aimed at both muslim and non muslim preschoolers, this book does a great job of telling and showing what a mihrab, a mimbar, and a mosque are, and introducing concepts of wudu and imam and jannah, that can be understood with the help of the glossary at the end.

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The book flows and really transports the reader to a peaceful and enchanting place where these shapes and concepts are powerful and wonderful.  A great message for everyone of every age.

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The book is 32 pages and really is worth every penny.  I would imagine that it will eventually make it to paperback, so if you need to wait, check your library and then stock up when you can.

Mommy’s Khimar by Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow illustrated by Ebony Glenn

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Mommy’s Khimar by Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow illustrated by Ebony Glenn

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Children playing dress-up with their mother’s clothes is a universal activity, that most can relate to.  Playing dress-up in your mother’s khimar is what makes this book both familiar and stereotype breaking in a way that is actually pretty powerful.

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In this 40 page hardback book targeting 4-8 year olds, Salaam Reads, once again brings Muslim characters to the masses, without alienating or talking down to either Muslim or non Muslims readers.

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The story starts off with a little girl explaining that “A khimar is a flowing scarf that my mommy wears.  Before she walks out the door each day, she wraps one around her head.”  She then marvels at the variety of scarves her mother has, commenting on the colors, and prints, and designs, that by the time she is ready to use them as her favorite make-believe accessory, readers will be wishing they too could have such an assortment.

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From using a khimar to be a queen with a golden train, to being a shooting star, the reader also along the way learns that she loves the connection the khimars offer her of her mother, when she isn’t near.  The ladies at the masjid are also part of that connection so that when she dreams of all the fantastical pretend things she can be, she also knows they too are with her.  Even her grandma, Mom-Mom, who exclaims “Sweet Jesus” when she sees her in her yellow khimar, and loves her although she doesn’t go to the mosque like the little girl does, is a part of the love and support the little girl feels by those around her when she is wrapped up in her mother’s khimar.  download (1)I love that it stresses even though her grandma is not Muslim they love each other because they are family.  Muslims and Islam are never mentioned outright, just the mosque and the ladies saying Assalamu alaikum, hint at the khimar being worn for religious reasons.

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Perhaps the best part is the pictures.  The illustrations with their yellowish hues radiate warmth and the faces and smiles are good for the soul.  You can feel the love the little girl both receives and gives to those around her through the pictures that perfectly compliment the simple text.

The diversity of the book in the main character being a girl, a child of color, and a Muslim, is such a beautiful thing to see.  Stories like this are powerful tools when children see themselves in books with positive messages, and remind us all how much more diversity it needed in literature to both highlight our differences, and celebrate our similarities.

 

To Catch a Bug by Nabeel Akbar illustrated by Anam Ahmed

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To Catch a Bug by Nabeel Akbar illustrated by Anam Ahmed

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This adorable preschool age book written in verse features a little girl who is fascinated by the bugs and creatures outside.  Highlighting Allah’s creations and adding in some humor, the little girl’s mom doesn’t love bugs very much, makes the book a silly read-a-loud that doesn’t get boring.

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The 8×8 size, 16 pages, makes it perfect for bedtime as it is labeled as a “bedtime short. ” The text size and length is ideal for the age group and the pictures perfectly engage the listeners with their chunky simplicity and brightness.

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The mom wears hijab, and Islamic phrases such as Subhanallah, Alhamdulillah, Inshallah, Bismillah are used, but not defined in the text, their is a glossary at the beginning.  Thus, it would work for non-Muslims, but the intended audience, i think, are little Muslim kids.

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