Tag Archives: Sunnah

Is That a Teapot by the Toilet: A Muslim Child’s Potty Training Story by Rabia Bashir illustrated by Basma Hosam

Standard
Is That a Teapot by the Toilet: A Muslim Child’s Potty Training Story by Rabia Bashir illustrated by Basma Hosam

I think I’ve loved every Bismillah/Precious Bees book I’ve ever read, and this book is no exception.  It is only the second children’s book I’ve ever seen on the subject of Islamic bathroom etiquette and I think combined with My First Muslim Potty Book, our little Muslims and their potty trainer adults are in a great position to explain, teach, laugh, and be successful in getting our little ones out of diapers and adopting Islamic Sunnahs and hygiene.   I love that this book is inspired by the author’s real life experiences, that it starts with a few WHO facts about the lack of access people have worldwide to a proper toilet with a portion of the book sales going to help those who lack hygienic facilities, and that the book is approved by a Sheikh.  Additionally, I love that there is a song that goes along with it (it isn’t posted yet, but will be shortly inshaAllah), that there are questions and games at the end with informative pages about istinja and the duas to be said, it is silly, the illustrations adorable and expressive, and overall just oh so relatable.  The book is perfect for ages three and up, and a great reminder resource for older kids that may need a nudge to stay on top of their bathroom behavior and feel normalized by seeing themselves in the pages.

It is a big day for mom and dad and Rayyan and Ridhwan.  Rayyan is going to start using the potty.  They have practiced entering the bathroom, but now they are going to do it for real: saying Bismillah and entering with the left foot first.  Only he uses his right, so they do it again, and it happens once more, and now mom and Rayyan are laughing and dancing.  The third time is the charm and in they go.

He sits on his little potty, and he goes, hurray, but when he starts to stand up, Mama explains that he must clean himself, all Muslims do.  Rayyan asks if that is a teapot when Mama lifts up what she calls in Bengali a bodna and his Urdu speaking father calls a lota.

Lota sticks and Rayyan is washed and ready to clean his hands before heading out the door with his right foot and saying Ghufranaka. So far so good, but it isn’t a one time thing.  There are a lot of days of accidents, but over time it gets better so the family decides to head out.  When all of a sudden Rayyan has to go, the family runs to a halal restaurant to borrow their restroom.

Phew they made it just in time, and instead of a teapot looking lota they have a watering can which makes his dad have to stand really far away to help him wash. Rayyan notices different places have lotas that look different than his does at home.  At a wedding they had to use a plastic cup, the mosque has a mini shower, at the park Mama pulls out a plastic bottle from her purse.  Rayyan decides he wants his own little bottle too, so they pick one out that he can keep in his backpack.  

One year later it is a big day for Ridhwan, he is about to start potty training, like kids all over the world. There is then a two page spread about many words different languages use to call the vessel that they use to wash themselves in the bathroom. There are questions to talk about regarding the story, a maze to get to the restroom in time, the Muslim Potty Training Song to the tune of the Hokey Gokey, which I’m assuming in America is the Hokey Pokey, a page answering What is Istinja?, Duas when using the toilet, the story behind the story, information about the illustrator and about the author.  All-in-all 48 pages.  

I purchased mine on Amazon, I think the local stockists will have it shortly and I would assume the bismillahbees.com website will as well.  I know the author recently had her father pass away, inna lillahi wa inna illayhi rajioon, so please make duas for her and her family, and be patient on the QR code and song which inshaAllah are forthcoming.

We’re off to Pray by Sana Munshey illustrated by Eman Salem

Standard
We’re off to Pray by Sana Munshey illustrated by Eman Salem

img_8684

This 8×8 hardback rhyming book for ages 4 and up is filled with detailed pictures that will remind children of all ages how important salat is despite how tempting it often is to neglect it.  I think six and seven year olds will benefit the most from this 30 page book that also has an activity poster included, as they start to take on the responsibility of praying on time and making good choices.  The gentle parents, the relatable scenario and the adorable little sister, bring this story to life, and will hopefully be a benefit for young muslims and their families.

img_8685

A small family of a mom, a dad, a brother and a sister are out working in the garden when the athan is heard.  The five prayers are mentioned as they set off to pray just like the Prophet (saw) did.

img_8686

They all head in to make wudu as wudu and salah go hand in hand.  They start with bismillah before going through the simplified steps to wash their sins away.  They are about to start, when the doorbell rings.

img_8687

Friends have come to play.  Mom and dad tell the boy to pray.  The boy says there will be time after they play.  Once takbeer is called, the boys slip out on their bikes.  The boy wants to have fun, but something is nagging at him and he wonders what the Prophet (saw) would have done.

img_8688

Whispers urge him to enjoy the beautiful day, but he realizes what he must do, and when his friends ask what is wrong he suggests they go pray.  Aqeemus salah!

img_8689

They head back to the boy’s house, make wudu and pray together. The steps are named and explained and after concluding he sees his proud parents watching.

img_8690

There is a glossary at the end and the poster has the steps of wudu and salat as well as an activity to put the steps in order.

img_8691

Samira’s Trip to the Masjid by Yara Kaleemah illustrated by Aveira Cartoon

Standard

img_8520

I’m a big fan of books featuring BIPOC leads in everyday situations, but when the quality of the product is subpar, I truly am conflicted if I should mention the book, or just tuck it away and pretend I never read it.  I’ve had this book tucked away for a while now, but I am pulling it out to bring attention to the importance of editors, proofers and revising.  The bar has been raised, Islamic fiction is becoming more and more mainstream.  The quality of many self published books rival and exceed traditionally published options, that to be putting out content that contains grammar errors (missing words, punctuation, random line breaks), spelling errors, voice and point of view inconsistencies, illustration errors, and content mishaps in a 26 page picture book, is not acceptable.  I feel like you are hurting the goal of representation and reflection, more than boosting it, when it is not well done.  I know that is harsh, but sadly minorities always have to do things better, it isn’t right, but it is the way it is.  You can argue my opinion that the story is too wordy or text heavy, but the technical components and final package in a $12 book, really need to be resolved.  The overall concept of the story is lovely: the Islamic details, the reminders about the sunnahs of Jummah, the little girl being excited to wear her favorite scarf and see a friend at the masjid, it really had a lot of potential.

img_8522

Samira greets the reader with As Salaamu Alaikum, as the fourth wall is breached and introduces herself as being a Muslim.  She then explains what being a Muslim is and tells the reader it is Jummah.  She asks her Ummi why we go to the masjid on Friday, before chiming in with all the information she in fact does know about Jummah.

img_8524

The next page details wudu as she prepares to go to the Masjid.  She then explains hijab as she tries to find her favorite green khimar with polka dots.  The words hijab, scarf and khimar are used interchangeable, causing a bit of confusion,  She explains that hijab is required by Allah swt to guard your chastity and that He also requires us to wear a khimar to the masjid.  I wish it would have clarified that we have to be covered when we pray, not necessarily just going to the masjid as she is a child, and many masjids are more than just places to pray, often having community halls and gyms.

img_8525

As the story continues she cannot find her favorite khimar no matter where she looks.  Ummi tries to give her some places to check, but in typical mom fashion, Samira can’t find it anywhere, and mom can find it immediately.  Samira shares some information about wearing your best clothes and they are off to the masjid not wanting to be late and hoping to get to the masjid first as the angels keep a record.  She finds her friend, and settles in to listen to the khutbah (misspelled as “Iman’s lecture” in the book).

img_8527

The conclusion of the book says “that even though Samira couldn’t find her favorite khimar, she was happy to take a trip to the masjid…”.  But she did find her favorite khimar? And on the very last page she is wearing the same shirts as she was at the masjid, but the polka dots have vanished from her green scarf?

img_8526

I’m hoping the author, illustrator, and publisher will clean up the book and someday republish it, we need these voices and images.

My First Muslim Potty Book by Yousfa Janjua illustrated by Golnar Servatian

Standard
My First Muslim Potty Book by Yousfa Janjua illustrated by Golnar Servatian

07041C66-B149-48A8-9CC7-B2752984EE68I’m not sure why this book is just coming out now and why I never realized how important it is.  It sounds silly, but we as Muslims are very precise about our bathroom habits and cleanliness and the fact that this is the first book to address it for children is actually, kind of surprising.  But Alhumdulillah, you only need one if it is done well, and over 16 pages of cute illustrated rhyme filled pages, istinja is explained and normalized.  The book is a great tool to use, not only, when potty training toddlers, but also for reviewing with your preschooler when they might be leaving home for the first time and/or seeing other people’s bathroom habits.

1539474F-D9B3-4803-9369-C42BDD28CA19

The book starts out with a thorough “Note to Parents” explaining istinja, tahara as well as giving parents some tips to handle potty training in general.  The book starts by noting how you started out as a baby and are now growing and part of the growth has you ready for big kid underwear.

A74AB75F-5449-414A-90F9-C80808740E2A

It talks about what it feels like when you need to go, and how when that feeling happens, you need to hurry to the bathroom.  If you hurry and still have an accident, we (the parents) will clean it up and not to worry.

F1F975D3-A359-4FB6-BFC7-4759105576F9

The book teaches that you enter with your left foot, and ask for help if you need it.  That you sit down to do your business because poop and pee are najis, impure. You then have to do istinja, which is like a germ fighting ninja!

EF818EB7-D841-4980-9EA3-C8611EDD61C3

It teaches the toddler to call for mom or dad to wash them with the lota or bidet or pot using their right hand to pour and their left to wash.  You then use toilet paper to dry.  After you flush, you wash your hands for 20 seconds, leave with your right foot and be done.

387407D6-0018-48DA-B178-68D305B53520

The book then has a glossary, some ayats of Quran and some Hadith as well as Duas relating to the bathroom.  The 8×8 hardback book is done really well and conveys the key points on a kid’s level, which is great.

FD85EF0C-098C-4AB4-B2AA-18970A399CB0

I love that the book uses Islamic Arabic words and shows a diverse family being patient and encouraging.  I am fine with the child illustrated as reading a book while on the toilet, but I think some parents might frown on that.  The book is meant for Muslim kids, and does a good job of showing the practicing family in the illustrations and in the text.

Thank you to Crescentmoonstore.com for their great price and service!

 

Bedtime Sunnahs Emaulating the Prophet one night at a time by Alia G. Dada illustrated by Robin Boyer

Standard
Bedtime Sunnahs Emaulating the Prophet one night at a time by Alia G. Dada illustrated by Robin Boyer

sunnah.jpg

A beautiful rhyming 11 page story for toddlers and up to learn parts of the Prophetic routine for bedtime.  Yes, 11 pages, the book in total is 28 pages, six are Appendixes, one is about the author, one is a dedication, and the rest are blank or title pages.  For a $15 book, I’m a little disappointed, which is unfortunate because the illustrations and information on those 11 pages is great.  The references are informative and important to see what Hadith the Sunnahs come from, but I think the story itself could have, and should have, been longer.

2D4EFF33-886B-46DB-92F6-74C7679D6F61

Each page has a different family getting ready for bed and doing various acts.  I love that moms and dads are involved in bedtime routines. The illustrations show diversity and the text is simple, flowing, rhyming and straight forward.

5EB6E7CC-3194-480E-9A58-EE259FAB9DB5

From brushing teeth to reciting Athkar, making duas to Allah and laying on our right side, each page has wonderful detail in the warm full color pages.  I love the decorations on the bedroom walls, signs with Allah’s name, statements saying “Strong like Zainab, Brave like Fatima, Smart like Khadija”, as well as “Smile! it’s Sunnah!”.

1DB8BDCD-6CEB-4104-B072-6A2D21951D71

The book is for Muslim children obviously, and makes getting ready for bed seem like a fun and bonding event.

The first Appendix is a Parents Notes on what the purpose of the book is and the second one is Islamic Terminology.  From the their Appendixes address the Ahadeeth about sleeping in a state of Wudu and on your right side, bedtime Atkhar, and reciting the three Quls,  I wish it would have including the Quls, seeming as the book is meant to provide information for caregivers to convey to a child, and many households may have non Muslims or new reverts in that role.

10500B30-4BF9-4473-94D5-F9D4EDFAEDD1

The remaining two reference pages are Additional Sunnahs for Advanced Children which include Reciting Ayah al Kursi, the last two verses of Surah al Baqarah, the dua before bed and when waking in the morning.  The dua texts are given, the Ayats are not. There is then a final page about the author.

F8DCC46D-0DFC-4A20-9E63-645B06FAE324

The hardbound glossy cover and thick inside pages are well done in this 8×8 perfect sized book for bedtime, I just wish there was more of it.

 

 

It’s Jummah! The Sunnah and Etiquettes of Friday! by Najia Rastgar & Lyazzat Mukhangaliyeva illustrated by Zainab Arshad

Standard
It’s Jummah! The Sunnah and Etiquettes of Friday! by Najia Rastgar & Lyazzat Mukhangaliyeva illustrated by Zainab Arshad

jummah cover

This is a very straight forward toddler board book about what you should do on Jummah.  The simple text, the blocky pictures and the overall size and feel of the book make it a great teaching tool for establishing routine. 

jum4

The book is 10 pages and measures at about 6×6 inches.  It is very sturdy and solid and perfect for babies up to 2 or 3 years old.

jum1

The day starts with waking up for jummah, taking a bath, reading Quran and praying in the mosque.

jum

I like that it is completely linear, and that the words under the pictures offer the Islamic vocabulary.  There are also no faces in the pictures. There isn’t a story, but the opening line of “Let’s wake up!” make your little one the star.  

jum3

There aren’t a lot of toddler board books out there, and thankfully this one doesn’t have any flaps to lift up or more text than a one year old can handle.  

My Dad’s Beard by Zanib Mian & Laura Ewing

Standard
My Dad’s Beard by Zanib Mian & Laura Ewing

cover-my-dads-beard

I honestly don’t think this 11×11, 32 page book could be any sweeter.  With just a few words on each page the simple sentences convey such love and warmth from a boy to his dad, by way of his beard.

MyDadsBeard3

 

The boy articulates that his father’s beard is different from his uncle’s and his grandfather’s and that his kisses tickle because of it.  He knows his sister loves his dad’s beard too because she holds it when she is scared.  Grandma says it makes him look like a real man, and the way it looks in the morning, is just silly.

dad's beard

The author is Muslim, but there is no overt Islamic content or depiction except for the one page that any Muslim would take to reference Prophet Muhammad (saw), see picture below.  Which is a great segue to talking about Rasulullah and his sunnah.

beardThe large bold pictures and simple words make this story perfect for kids a year old and up.  The book definitely deserves a place on every bearded baba’s book shelf.  I challenge you to read this book and not smile, I am confident it will win you over, no matter how many times your little one asks you to read it.

My-Dads-Beard-book1

My only complaint, is that given the size of the book, and how perfect it is for little kids and in story time, the soft pages flop over.  It is impossible to hold the book, read it, and show the pictures in one go, you have to juggle a bit more than one would want. Additionally something to note, is that on the pages where the boy talks about his uncle and granddad, the diction is clearly more British than English. My older kids remarked, but it definitely wasn’t a problem.

Here is a link for the book trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uf7tbvJ5aSw